Indoor Plants and Burning Candles

I have 6 different (palm, dieffenbachia, peace lily, philodendrons) indoor plants in my living area and recently I started burning scented candles in this area. All seemed to be fine until I noticed the leaves on the palm plant were turning brown on the tips. The browning has moved down the leaves on just a few shoots. Is this a coincidence, the burning candles and the browning leaves, or is something else wrong? I check the moisture level always before watering and I can't say that the soil has ever been dry or overly wet. Can one burn scented candles in areas where plants are growing?
Jim Pettway
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Candles won't affect the plants PHYSICALLY, but the plants may be turning brown as a form of revenge for subjecting them to something as tasteless and annoying as scented candles. Think of it as a child who's not ill, but is acting out because of something he/she has a problem with. The plants are trying to tell you that men are not supposed to use scented candles. Matter of fact, male infants can suffer damage to their nervous systems if taken into a Yankee Candle Shop.
Lose the candles.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

No, you are mistaken. Infants, of any sex, will rebel against any nice smells. And will try to defeat them. They have no shame. That is why they are smiling so often. Especially when you try to change their nappy/diaper.
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Is THAT the reason for the stink? :-) To protect the species from Yankee Candle addicts?
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Jim Pettway wrote:

I think it's a coincidence. The plants probably appreciate the extra carbon dioxide. Try unscented candles and see if it makes a difference.
Bob
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Do you mist your plants? Indoor plants like to be misted in the winter since the humidity is so low and the air is dry. -Felder
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wrote:

Cool Mist humidifier at WalMart for $29. We bought two for the plants.

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Thanks for all of the comments. I especially like the "plant revenge" theory! I think that I'll try the mist idea as I have overlooked doing such this winter and I do know from past experience that misting does help in the dry of winter.
Jim Pettway

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When's the last time the palm was repotted? What you're describing sounds like "tip burn", often due to a buildup of soluble salts in the soil. Leach or repot.
As far as the candles go, consider losing them, especially if your house isn't drafty. They can be a major cause of indoor air pollution, and soot in lungs can be pretty devastating long-term. Soot on plants blocks the stomata needed for gas exchange in the leaves.
Kay

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