Indoor gardening & lighting

Greetings, I started a small vegatable garden two years ago. I had been buying plants that someone else had started and are ready to be transplanted, but it's pretty expensive. This year I'd like to start my plants from seeds. The temperature here in the northeast is still below freezing at night. The only space I have avaiable is my basement. Is there any good online info about lighting?
Thanks!
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flourescent grow light lamps (there are various brands). Most basements are warm enough at the upper reaches where the windows are typically located... some people use some small incandescent bulbs for extra warmth if needed.
But why bother... wait until the outdoor temperatures are more hospitable (after the danger of frost has passed) and sow seeds directly in the ground... transplanting small seedlings often sends them into shock and they'll probably never fully recover, substantially reducing crops produced if any.
I live in the north east, I've tried every early sowing method there is, ultimately none other than professional greenhouses is more beneficial than direct sowing in the ground. For the number of plants I want in my home garden I buy as many of the mature nursery plants as I can, costs less than buying packets of seed I'll never use up and all the potting stuff, and of course time and labor.
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germination tray, with its' six-pack inserts (I use the 72 plant inserts, 6 X 12), and the transparent top. Tray inserts and top will come to about $10.

Because of the cost and inconvenience, I'm surprised that brooklyn1 doesn't have it delivered, and have a gardener stick it in a hole, so that she can admire it from her study. That is to say, there is more to gardening than just a decorative effect. But I'll leave the explanation of that to someone more facile with words than myself.
What wondrous life in this I lead! Ripe apples drop about my head; The luscious clusters of the vine Upon my mouth do crush their wine; The nectarine and curious peach Into my hands themselves do reach; Stumbling on melons, as I pass, Ensnared with flowers, I fall on grass.
Meanwhile the mind from pleasure less Withdraws into its happiness; The mind, that ocean where each kind Does straight its own resemblance find; Yet it creates, transcending these, Far other worlds, and other seas; Annihilating all that 's made To a green thought in a green shade.
Here at the fountain's sliding foot, Or at some fruit-tree's mossy root, Casting the body's vest aside, My soul into the boughs doth glide; There, like a bird, it sits and sings, Then whets and preens its silver wings, And, till prepared for longer flight, Waves in its plumes the varied light.
- Andrew Marvell (1621 -1678)
Where I live, I can get a pack of seeds for the same price as one plant. If you are only going to have one plant, seeds don't make much sense, unless it is a plant that local nurseries don't stock.
After all we are talking vegetables here. Something to delight the senses.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
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wrote:

I'd be surprised if brooklyn1 wasn't sheldon incognito. Funny thing, sheldon quit posting just before brooklyn1 appeared. Similar attitude. If not, it is quite proud of it's large estate and mega-tools, as evidenced by all the fotolinks (similar to sheldon's acreage).......btw.......that picture of the rocklined ditch, or very similar, showed up here a couple of years ago and I am curious who was the poster. I'm funny like that, you know. I'm also funny 'bout wealth and ostentatious displays and mentions and pictures of such. Kinda of a.........thing from olden days.

Nice.
Bill had a nice followup also.
--
Charlie

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2009/03/21-5
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The issue is not the plant but the plant variety. One of the joys of gardening is growing what we love to eat and have fond memories of. Sure it is arduous but the labor of gardening is not for you if you consider it work. It is pure joy.
Bill got any Marglobe seed. I do. A 1950 tomato is a good example acid and good to eat right in the garden warm and moist. But I must stop or sexuality references will flow . Juicy....
Small Hawk 1 hour ago
Everyone looks about The small winged slayer Startled by my encroachment flew Knowing where the easy kills abide
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA







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wrote:

I enjoy your haiku.
Your reference to marglobe recalled an essay I recently stumbled upon, part of which extolled the value of viable open pollinated seed.
quote follows link....which I doubt few will bother to read...
http://www.richardheinberg.com/museletter/110
"Starting many decades ago, people began - by necessity - to learn how to grow their own food. Not everyone was successful, and there was a lot of hunger. One of the frustrating things was the lack of good seeds. Very few people knew anything about saving seeds from one season to the next, so existing seed stocks were depleted very quickly. There was also a big problem with all the modern hybrid varieties: few of the garden vegetables that were planted would produce good seeds for the next year. The genetically engineering plants were even worse, causing all sorts of ecological problems that we're still dealing with, particularly the killing off of bees and other beneficial insects. The seeds of good open-pollinated food plants are like gold to us."
Sometimes I soar, sometimes I despair, my friend....
Charlie
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On Sat, 21 Mar 2009 11:31:12 -0700 (PDT), BuckK

I have no idea about online sources, but do check at your local library. Plants successfully germinated under fluorescent lighting include asparagus, brussel sprouts, cabbage, lettuce, cauliflower, cucumbers, eggplant, and radishes. Onions and tomatoes grow exceptionally well. Broccoli, most herbs, root crops, squash, melons, and peppers are much better with natural sunlight, perhaps on a sunny window sill. A simple setup should include at least 2 shoplights (2 four-foot florescent tubes each) with chains and timer. Select lamp fixtures with large reflectors. BTW, African violets and begonias are outstanding under lamplights.
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