If you have squirrels stealing your bird seed this could be of interest

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Yes you can. An Absolute II Squirrel Proof Feeder from Duncraft will be squirrel proof for about 10 years. Then one figures it out and they all learn how to get at the feed. At this point you have to relocate all the squirrels in the territory to across some body of water. That will wipe out the knowledge. You will then have another 10 years.
However, if you continue relocating squirrels, after a few years they figure out that something is wrong with the territory and they stay away. That solves the digging up of the window boxes.

As pointed out that is expensive. I pay $75 for 50 pounds of hulled sunflower seeds from Anderson Seed. It includes delivery. Their consumer website: http://stores.bayflowerbirdfeed.com /
This Winter has been so warm I will only go through 125 pounds.
As for why hulled? I started with regular sunflower seeds, but all the hulls made a huge mess.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Cute trick.
Squirrels have a life span of 6 years, yet it takes them 10 years to figure the feeder out. How does that work?
Looking at the picture, all the squirrel has to do is hang onto the house, not the platform.
--
Dan Espen

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I dunno. I can only go by my experience.

The only way they can get to the feed is to hang onto the pole and reach under the bar that pulls down.
After the first season, when I relocated* more than 40 squirrels, it was interesting to watch. At first the newcomers to the territory didn't realize it contained food. Then one got on the top and slide off and fell 6' to the deck. After another month one tried and pulled on the bar, and of course it closed.
But I still had the problem of dug up window boxes. So I continued. This Winter there have been no squirrels at the feeder at all. And only a few times have I seen one or two pass by on the telephone/cable wires. I guess periodically one comes over to check out the territory. Come early Summer there will be new ones. The ones born this year won't necessarily know to avoid the territory. If I want to keep my window boxes undug, those will have to also be relocated.
* I have a trailer for my bicycle. I do not contribute to global warming to do this. And I get some exercise.
Once I was bicycling back and a fellow could see the trap in the black plastic bag. He pulled alongside to chat. He told me about the time they hung a feeder at the end of a long wire. He said the squirrels would slide down the wire and bang their head on the feeder. But this did not stop them.
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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What nonsense, I've been living with squirrels for 40 years. Two or three years is as long as they last. They can be irritating, if you leave plants at the foot of a tree, or you can just put a collar of chicken wire around the tree. I found a squirrel once in the chicken wire one day, struggling to move around, after he saw me, and did a double take, he took off, and I never saw a sign again that he had gone back to the chicken wire. Squirrels are cute. Squirrels are fun, and they were here first.
--

Billy

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I looked up grey squirrels' lifespan in Wikipedia. I found "These squirrels can live to be 20 years old in captivity, but in the wild usually only live up to 12.5 years."
Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Odd.
Do a Google search for "squirrel lifespan" and the first 5 or 6 links say 5-6 years.
--
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wrote:

Depends on where, in West Virgina they're harvested for the stew pot at two years old. This monster will keep squirrels out: (Amazon.com product link shortened)30096582&sr=1-1-fkmr0
But no matter which feeder, birds will knock lots of seed to the ground regardless, so I don't bother with the squirrel proof rube goldbergs with all their springs and levers that wear out... bird seed is plenty cheap enough... and masny birds prefer eating on teh ground; doves, cardinals, etc. And squirrels really don't eat a lot nor do they knock much seed to the ground, not compared to starlings, blue jays, and other birds, even tiny junkos and chickadees are very messy eaters. I just feed them all, an extra bag or two of seed a year won't put me in the poor house.
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It's all a matter of the superior mind winning out.
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Billy

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On Thu, 23 Feb 2012 13:30:21 -0800, Billy

Yes, it's called feeding the squirrels. They like peanuts a lot.
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wrote:

I use walnuts.
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Billy

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