If you have squirrels stealing your bird seed this could be of interest

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Squirrels stealing your birdseed? http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item '0920257879&ssPageNameME:L:LCA:US:1123
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doctoroe wrote:

Bird seed is cheap, squirrels need to eat too.
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http://cgi.essssssbay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item '0920257879&ssPageNameME:L:LCA:US:1123 What a load of crap.
I've seen squirrels climb right over shields 3 times that size.
Anyway, squirrels go with the whole deal. Feed birds, you're going to feed the squirrels. If nothing else, the birds throw the seeds everywhere. If you don't keep the area clean you're going to feed a lot of other animals, including rats.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

At night the deer lick up every seed they find on the ground, rabbits too. In season the Canada geese are the cleaners. Squirrels have to wait their turn.
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On Feb 21, 9:46pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

So are you telling me that the bird feeder I have in my rose garden is attracting the deer that are eating the roses? MJ
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wrote:

Very likely.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> writes:

Every little bit of food helps, but I think the deer like roses even without a seed side dish.
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Dan Espen

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wrote:

True. But variety is even more attractive. If you have deer about you might want to consider fencing your roses. All my susceptible shrubs, small trees, etc. are fenced. I've learned that they don't eat spruce, foxglove, daffodils, etc. so those I plant wherever. I have one hybrid rose bush, it's fenced. There are several wild rose bushes about in hedgerows, the deer won't bother with those thorns. Butterfly bush is supposedly not eaten by deer so I will plant one this spring as as test. Forsythia is safe too. However once one deer finds your bird seed it will return several times each day looking for more, and soon others will follow suit.
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On 2/22/2012 2:46 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

My butterfly bushes have not been eaten. I'm getting tired of fencing everything off and refuse to do it any more and wife won't let me shoot the deer.
Squirrels and racoons have been cleaning out my bird feeder. Last half cup of seed I put out had a tablespoon of hot pepper flakes added to it and they ate it any way.
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Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> writes:

Back when I didn't have a fence the deer ate the Forsythia too. But the Forsythia new growth kept pace with the destruction.
Nothing works better than a fence.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

Agreed. Everything else is just a waste of time, effort, and money.
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On Wed, 22 Feb 2012 14:46:34 -0500, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

I have nearly a dozen lavender buhelias in my yard (they're easy to propagate from cuttings), and I can say that the deer around here seem to pay them no attention. The roses, I need to spray with a deterrent, which stinks to high heaven. The parcel to the west of us used to be leased to a commercial rose grower, and they finally moved.
Forsythia is safe too. However once one deer

Once the deer find the glop of peanut butter on the electric fence around the vegetable garden, well, they stay away from the vegetable garden after that.
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wrote:

I hang bu bird feeder from a tree branch. It has the cowl to make it difficult for squirrels, and rats, but the central axis of the bird feeder, its supply of seeds, is surrounded by a wire cage that will only allow access to a bird about the size of a chickadee. I did have trouble with a rat before he came to an ugly end. Fortunately, I had the feeder on a pully so that I could lower it to refill the seed. I let the feeder half way down, and and my problems were cured. I presume it was just too much of a hassle for him, what with having to go up and down a wire cord to get to the feeder.
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
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http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item '0920257879&ssPageNameME:L:LCA:US:1123 You cannot defeat squirrels. They will always figure out a way. I get 2 pound bags of bird seed at Lowes for about 10 bucks. It's just easier to feed everyone. I like the squirrels. They don't eat the birds like the crows do.
Paul
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Paul M. Cook wrote:

I've never seen crows eating live birds. Crows are carrion eaters. Crows don't eat bird seed either. I toss out meat trimmings, the crows clean it up within minutes. Crows don't eat where they find food, as soon as they can pick off small enough bits they carry it off to a safe place, crows also prefer to eat solitary.
Five dollars a pound is some mighty pricy bird seed. I buy 40 pound bags of high quality bird seed at Agway for $35... I get the Ultimate: http://www.fancyflightbirdfeed.com/Feed-Products.aspx
I also buy 50 pound bags of cracked corn for $15 to throw on the ground for squirrels and other critters Squirrels and larger critters prefer to eat off the ground, as long as there's food on the ground they leave the seed in my feeder alone alone. I also feed suet, woodpeckers and starlings prefer that. I also buy day old baked goods, all the critters eat that. I buy carrots for the deer too. I don't put anything edible in my trash, even meat drippings get poured onto the frozen ground. Meat bones ane poultry carcasses all gets eatten, whatever scraps I put out by morning they're gone. Even crumbs from a package of crackers makes a meal for some small critter. I even clean my toaster outside.
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On Thu, 23 Feb 2012 12:01:46 -0500, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Well, usually by the time they're eating them, the birds are dead. However, they do hunt and kill smaller bird species. They also harass hawks (I think that only works because of their greater numbers)

I can't say whether they do or not, but they do eat walnuts - they'll pick them up (yea, the big walnut shells), fly up and drop them onto roads and wait for cars to drive over them and then come down and eat the flesh. Terribly annoying when I lived in an area where someone had a productive walnut tree in their backyard, because the crows really didn't care if they dropped them ON the cars.
On the topic of avian diets - we've had great blue herons (birds you'd find in an estuary perhaps), fly into the yards around here and successfully hunt gophers. It's quite a sight, not only to see them stalk and kill, but down the whole thing down that pencil-thin neck.
Both Herons and Ravens are considered highly intelligent birds. One of the indicators of animal intelligence is their adaptability to different food sources when their preferred food source is scarce (too many species simply starve instead of finding something else to eat).
I know our barn owls don't hunt in the vicintity of their nesting box, but at the end of last season, there were a LOT of owl pellets (hocked up hair and bone) in the nesting box. They ate well. I hear the cricket-like chirping in there when I step out to the barn at night.

We have buzzards for that here. Eco-friendly way to get rid of dispatched possums. Used to leave out gophers and moles, now I feed the fresh gophers to our cat, and just leave out the moles (which the cat will have nothing to do with).

You sound like you spend a lot on feeding the wildlife in your area. I buy food for only one type of animal: my chickens. They give me eggs in return. Everybody else finds enough around here or else they wouldn't live here.
Of course, you live in an area where you get snow & freeze, so year-round forage is probably more limited.
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Sean Straw wrote:

I spend hardly any time at all feeding critters... I'm not sustaining them, I'm only attracting them, mostly I'm entertaining myself and for a whole lot less money than people spend on show tickets, ball game tickets, and pretentious restos that serve lousy food. Most critters migrate to warmer climes when weather here becomes too harsh and what a lot of folks don't realize is that critters change their diet with the seasons. People who hunt all use the weak alibi that deer need to be culled or they'll starve, nothing can be further from the truth. With the first snowfall deer stop eating grass and eat woody plants instead. When the pinheads come across a dead deer they jump to the false conclusion that it died of starvation when in fact it died of disease, old age, and often from a wound inflicted by a cross eyed hunter... every spring I find shot deer in my back fields, many with an arrow still in them, I have a five gallon bucket chock full of hunter's arrows. And I can't tell you how many rotting deer I find minus their head. Hunting is not a sport, it's legalized murder.
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 15:48:03 -0500, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

buying a quantity of different feeds. Hey, whatever entertains you.
[snip]

Uhm, dunno how we made a left turn into the politics of hunting, but IMO, doing it for _food_ is one thing (how's humanely dispatching a deer any worse than how a cow, sheep, etc meets its end to put food on your table). I'd never dream of hanging a dead animal part in my house, and it's unfortunate that people are clearly dispatching animals merely for trophies.
As for in your back fields - if they're YOUR fields, you aught to string up fencing and post no trespassing/hunting signs all over and start getting proactive about dealing with the trespassing.
Perhaps you could try to isolate where the access roads are that they're parking on, and start identifying vehicles and contacting the DFG or Sheriff.
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Brooklyn1 wrote: ...

they will raid bird nests.
songbird
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I've seen a crow carrying a live baby robin.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden

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