Identify Plant

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Can anybody identify this plant? My brother gave it to me, neither he or I know what it is.
I have posted a picture here: http://figbug.dnsalias.org/gallery/Misc/IMG_5789
Thank You Roland
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Try looking under Euphorbia Crown of thorns.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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Euphorbia milii var. splendens
The plant appears to not be getting enough light. Try moving it to a south facing window and it should bloom.

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On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 06:24:31 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

(common name: Crown of Thorns -- sorry Cereoid)

Yep. It definitely needs light. It's a pretty easy-care plant. Let dry out between watering, give it lots of light, and it has very pretty little blooms ranging through cream, pink, and orange shades. Is vrey easy to propagate from tip cuttings.
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Sorry Frogger but the common name "Crown of Thorns" is not very specific. It is commonly used for a wide variety of spinescent Madagascar Euphorbia species, their hybrids and cultivars.
Euphorbia milii var. splendens has red "flowers" but the hybrids and cultivars come in a wide range of colors. The Thai Poysean hybrids have large showy flower clusters that resemble those of Hydrangeas
wrote

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south
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 14:13:42 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

I'm sure you're correct. I *did* apologize for the 'common' name. I have several of the whatevers/hybrids that, when not totally neglected, produce cute little flowers(!) in several colors (1 color per plant/hybrid/cultivar). I note that it (Euphorbia milii var. splendens) is a groundcover, forsooth, in warm climates. And with bright red flowers. However, Mr. Monkey's plant looked pretty much like a 'Crown of Thorns' houseplant in the dark. Not exactly in the class of "creeping Charlie" or "pigweed." :-)
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Cereoid - do you have a good website reference for determining variety/hybrid of 'crown of thorns' I inherited one a while ago and am not sure of the variety. Although it does have the everbooming reddish lowers - the stems on it are quite small compared to others I have seen. Tina
wrote

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I could refer you to the Crown of Thorns Yahoo group. You will find there links to other websites and nurseries that list the various cultivars.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Crown_of_Thorns /
You could even post a picture in the photo album to be identified.

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Thank you I'll check it out.

not
seen.
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In no way could any of the "Crown of Thorns" Euphorbias be considered anything remotely resembling a ground cover. All are spiny shrubs with upright branches. None grow prostrate on the ground.
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2003 22:56:30 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

I would not say that. In california where this is used as an outdoor planting, the plants may be either prostrate, as they flop over with some size, and form a tangle which certainly covers the ground, in that the ground IS COVERED, tho not in the sense that a grass covers it; also there are some very tiny bushy forms which if planted close together, would certainly be groundcovers.
hermine
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Is a thorny thicket the same as a ground cover? Afraid not.
A spiny shrub that flops over is not a groundcover.
Hermine is tripping again.
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 05:57:37 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

in terms of what the plant does garden-wise, certain Crow-Of-Thorns, under rather ideal conditions, will cover the ground very thickly. When i first moved to California, I just happened to live a short distance from Abbey Gardens, and they did a nice planting of Crown-of-Thorns. at first they were neat and bushy, but in short order they grew together to form quite a thicket. they literally covered the ground. Now, if you are going to be stuffy and insist that their is an official list of "ground covers"----and many people who do not think out of the box, well, they do think this way, they can say it is not so. NEVERTHELESS, anyone who has seen rampant growth of prostrate and entangled Crown Of Thorns, would have to say, if asked, is the ground covered with this plant? well, they would have to say YES.
unlike yoursef, i actually can trip the light fantastic, i assume that is the trip to which you refer, Manteca.
hermine
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Pure gibberish it is you speak, Herminerrhoid. You have neglected to take your meds again.
Groundcovers cover the ground and are typically something that can be walked on.
An impenetrable hedge thicket of spiny shrubs cannot in any way be considered anything even remotely resembling a groundcover. Except maybe it would be by your bizarre Addams family standards.
Its about time for you to go back into your box. Its still too early in the week for your perverse trick or treat pranks.
wrote:

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On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 12:23:15 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

So by your definition, Steve, you would be considered a form of groundcover.
herm
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Back it up, Cereoid. If you search on "crown of thorns" groundcover (or "ground cover") you will find many references with the 2 associated terms. "Groundcover" pretty much means something relatively low-growing that covers the ground -- i.e., spreads and presents a reasonable facade of respectably ordered landscape. Grass, ivy, portulaca, and (oh, the poetry) chamomile. You don't have to enjoy walking on it with bare feet for have it qualify as groundcover. I believe when you identified it with the correct name, the first reference I turned up said "ground cover, zones 10-11". Certainly a surprise to me, but evidently an not uncommon use.
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Well, not all groundcover is meant to be walked on. the succulent ice plants which line some of California's freeways come immediately to mind. If "lawns" are your idea of groundcover, there are very few plants which fit. the "naturalizing" selections of bulbs, sold for a high price by White Flower Farms, this is also a kind of groundcover, which one would never mistake for something to be walked upon. groundcover means different things in different places, but it does have a larger meaning, and that was my reference when i so classified Crown of Thorns. herm
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Yes, a groundcover can be a spreading plant that covers the ground that may be too fleshy to walk on with bare feet but still they are plants that spread horizontally and are not tall shrubs.
Calling a thicket of spiny shrubs is really distorting the meaning of groundcover to the absurd no matter how anyone tries to justify it. A more appropriate term for their use would be hedge or living fence. Most popular horticultural references are flawed anyway and typically screw up out of ignorance when it comes to succulent and xerophytic plants and their uses.
None of the spinescent "Crown of Thorns" are horizontal growers. I should know, I have compiled a complete listing of all the species in the group that is Euphorbia subgenus Lacanthis.
wrote:

walked
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The plant was in a lot better shape before I went on holiday. I don't think it was watered while I was away. When I came back about 75% of the leaves had fallen off. They are starting to grow back now.
The plant is a cutting from my brothers plant. He originally bought it from the biology department at a University. At the end of each term they sell all their plants for a $1 each.
My brother just sold his condo, one of the subject tos on the contract was that his crown of thorns be included in the deal. I thought that was funny.
Anyway, thanks for all the help everybody, Roland

I
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I had one of these that gave me little very bright orange-red flowers year round in a window with lots of sun.
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