ID this type of farm BRIDGE, please

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:-)) Yebbut, did it always have that motor? Can you win the kewpie and answer?
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FarmI wrote:

I would guess the motor was added after it was moved and put together narrower than it was originally. Before being moved it was wider to handle vehicle traffic, and again, it had no motor/pump in it's first life.
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wrote in message

Are you really stupid or are you just trying to appear that way?
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wrote in message

There you go, as expected. Your picture does not match the picture from the OP. Height of water intake and outgo matters when siphoning.
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The OP asked a) whether there would have been irrigation ditches without bridges, and b) how did the water get out of the ditch and onto the field with a pump. My response answered both of those questions. Ask someone for help if you can't understand that.
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wrote in message

Ah, you are changing your story, the mark of a true troll! (Longevity on a group had no bearing on the determination of a troll).
She was asking if there would have been THESE ditches without such bridges, and how would you get water out of THIS ditch without a pump. You answered neither question, but possibly brought confusion to any reader who might not understand how siphons work.
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I haven't changed my story at all. You just can't read competently.

No, that was not the question asked. Try rereading what was written.
The question was 'would there have been ditches without these bridges' (the answer to that is yes, there would have been). The next question was 'how did you get the water out of the ditch and onto the field without the bridge/pump system' (the answer to that is the syphon system I mentioned and that Dean also knows about).

No that wasn't the question asked. No mention whatsoever if 'these' ditches or 'this' ditch.
You answered

You need to get out and look at irrigation ditches and how irrigation is done. As Dean mentioned, these days pumps are mostly used but that is not the only way to apply water from an irrigation channel and nor is the irrigation channel shown by the OP the only way irrigation channels look at all times or across a whole farm.
If you got out and actually looked at irrigation channels and you might have some sort of clue about how they could be used without access to a pump.
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I am fully aware of farm and ranch irrigation and drainage systems. You keep trying to say I don't know about or understand siphons. I keep telling you siphons won't work with the ditches the OP is concerned about.
Goodbye!
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And I keep telling you that the OP did not ask a question about any specific irrigation channels. The question was a general one about how to get water out without a pump. If you have the knowledge you say that you do, you should be able to apply it. You have shown no capacity to do that.
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Ann wrote:

Here is a very large one I travel on a couple days a week. All 20 pics are this same bridge. It's a very unique design.
http://bridgehunter.com/tn/jefferson/bh37371 /
I don't know why part of it is concrete? The highest steel span is also wider, it looks as if it were made for large sail boats but I don't think the lake is deep enough for a boat that large. Being so old and carrying a lot of traffic, it under goes an inspection every year and it is closed for the day of the inspection.
It must be a part of the great TVA (Tennessee valley authority) project because they built the dam that made this bridge necessary. In the winter when there isn't a lot of rain they use all the water for hydro-electric and the lake becomes a river again. Some people bought Lake Front houses during the summer, then in the winter it's dirt and mud for hundreds of yards until they can reach the river. Some bitch, some buy 4 wheelers to take advantage of the wintertime fun.
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On Wed, 26 May 2010 22:06:33 -0400, Tony wrote:

Nifty bridge, actually several bridges strung together. Is it possible they put it so high to allow for raising the level of the lake? The COE constructed two flood control dams (3 impounds) in my county in PA. They later raised one dam/impound to store additional water for downstream nuclear plants cooling.
Here is "my" niftiest bridge:
http://explorepahistory.com/displayimage.php?imgId 08
When the Rockville bridge was built across the Susquehanna River (PA) in 1900-1902, it was described as the longest stone arch bridge (3,280') in the world. (Not entirely true because it was concrete filled.)
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There's a stone arch bridge across the river entering Merida, Spain, that was constructed by the Romans and is still carrying 2-lane highway traffic, including trucks. It's been a while since I was there, but I don't think it's quite as long as yours. I also remember that one arch looked like it had collapsed and been repaired. The later stone work was not as high quality as the Roman masonry.
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Larry wrote:

It probably fell during an earthquake. Barring that Keystone arches are some of the strongest structures you can build with stone.
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On Thu, 27 May 2010 07:01:28 -0700, Larry wrote:

The Rockville bridge's claim to fame is its length/mass. But the span of the individual arches is short, relative to stone arch bridges that are considered engineering accomplishments.
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Ann wrote:

That is a nifty bridge indeed! I've never heard of stone bridge being filled with concrete, but then again, I don't know much of anything on that subject. I'm from PA so I wanted to see were it was and found these pics:
http://www.steamphotos.com/Railroad-Photos/Rockville-Bridge-Harrisburg/3405975_DzATG#231852985_Gtcrs
I'll bet that's a heck of a photo op when an old steam loco takes a pleasure ride. I also read it was built in only 2 years! It would probably take 6 years to build the same exact bridge today. :-(
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On Thu, 27 May 2010 10:57:42 -0400, Tony wrote:

Imagine the task of taking it down. I doubt they could just blow it up because of all the sediment that would put into the river - and ultimately into the Chesapeake Bay.
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Ann wrote:

Kind of a sedimental journey.
Steve southiowa
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On Thu, 27 May 2010 14:13:36 -0500, Steve.IA wrote:

<groan> <grin>
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Ann wrote:

I don't think it's possible for it to rise anywhere near that high... on second look at the pictures I did just notice the high water marks that do go very high! I sometimes go boating there (there is a public boat ramp at the south end) and I'll have to take notice how much room is under the bridge from its highest water marks.
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Interesting reading! The Patterned peatlands of Minnesota By Herbert Edgar Wright, Barbara Coffin, Norman E. Aaseng
http://tinyurl.com/2awmpwt
http://books.google.com/books?id=GeVONV-Mp4kC&pg=RA1-PA263&lpg=RA1-PA263&dq=chippewa+drainage+ditch&source=bl&ots=xnO8_PcVuq&sig=vqb66aksOcaE61m119sdtJtlqvk&hl=en&ei=qgEDTO-EN4zANb7WmZkK&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved B4Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=chippewa%20drainage%20ditch&flse
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