ID this type of farm BRIDGE, please

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It looks to me like the bridge was built to do exactly what it is doing,which is to hold a turbine pump. It's plenty stout, so maybe it originally held an engine to run the turbine, which has been replaced with an electric motor. The rack in the center is to pull the pump during the winter to avoid freeze or flood damage. The canal is an irrigation canal. Follow it toward the river and you will find a headgate and probably a small diversion dam to channel water into the canal.
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Thanks for all the input, everybody. I've sent an inquiry to the local historical society. I'd love to know when this was built. WPA project? Did they have this technology when my family owned the farm (1903ish to 1925ish)? I'll be in the area again for Memorial Day Weekend to decorate the graves of family members and will try to take more pictures then. Didn't get a single one straight across the traveling path of the bridge!
R.
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On Wed, 26 May 2010 07:02:43 -0700 (PDT), MNRebecca

Is there still a Grange or some old agricultural society in the area?

Take some prints to the local gin-mill & diner and ask the old timer sitting at the bar/counter.
Jim
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On Wed, 26 May 2010 07:02:43 -0700, MNRebecca wrote:

Courtesy of Google, it looks like what's referred to as a pony truss bridge. In the early 1900s, they were the cheapest bridge design for short spans and a number of companies made them. By the time the depression and WWII were over, highway departments had moved on to newer designs (than steel truss). Example of one still in use:
http://bridgehunter.com/in/gibson/2600283/
Consider the possibility that "your" bridge was repurposed from its original use/location. As those bridges were phased out, some were probably free for the taking.
But the best way to solve the mystery is to inquire locally this weekend.
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I am LOVING the idea that the reason my tough ol' great great grandma had $5,000 to give each grandchild in the 1920s (money that disappeared in 1929, of course) was because she looked out over the tributary ditch one day and said, "You know, if I took one of those bridges they're giving away and put it across the ditch, I could rig up a pumping system to better irrigate my fields!" But would there have been ditches WITHOUT such bridges in the first place? How did you get the water out of the ditch and onto the field without the bridge/pump system?
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Quite likely. In most of the world where ditch irrigation is used no pump is involved. Methods of getting water from the ditch to the field generally require the ditch water level to be higher than the bottoms of the furrows in the field. To get water across the ditch bank there are siphon tubes, removable barriers as simple as a plank, etc.
    Una
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or, if they used a pump initially at ground level, it would be less efficient since it had to do a lot of "sucking". With the bridge in place, they could easily put the pump in the water, driven by a shaft from the motor on the bridge.
I concur that the bridge was probably reused from some other purpose.
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On Wed, 26 May 2010 12:02:52 -0700, MNRebecca wrote:

You mentioned in your op that the ditch is along/on the property line. It would seem that to irrigate farm A, it would have been simpler to put the pump on the bank and run an intake pipe up from the ditch. But say both farm A and farm B wanted to irrigate. The bridge and a single pump might have been the more frugal solution.
(Yes, I know that's a stretch.)
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Flood irrigation. A system where you divert the stream into a series of irrigation ditches that water the fields passively without the use of pumps. In Phoenix AZ, some people have their lawns done this way instead of using city water. The system was developed by the Anasazi who no longer inhabit the region. The only down side to that are the stinking minnows that wind up in the yards.
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Of course there would have been. Watering can be moved out of the ditch by hand very easily using a simple syphon method and that is common enough even today. See pic on this cite: http://www.pump-zone.com/piping/piping/siphons-and-the-siphon-effect-that-sucking-sound.html
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wrote in message

http://www.pump-zone.com/piping/piping/siphons-and-the-siphon-effect-that-sucking-sound.html
only if you turn the whole world on its head. Siphoning from a lower to a higher point sounds like a perpetual motion machine. Are you trolling?
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You are obviously in misc.rural, FarmI has been posting in rec.gardens for many years and is a valuable source of information to us.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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On Thu, 27 May 2010 08:20:36 -0700, Billy wrote:

"Farm1" (Fran) has been posting to misc.rural a few months short of 10 years.
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wrote in message

God! Is it really that long? I'm suddenly feeling even older than I normally do! You really know how to depress a girl Ann.
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On Fri, 28 May 2010 11:08:29 +1000, FarmI wrote:

I checked by doing a lookup at groups.google.com; iirc the first post they have is Aug, 2000. Didn't look up my first post but it was in early 1996 ... even more depressing.
To now go completely off topic, do you know how much damage the volcanic ash did where Janet lives?
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She's posted to say that there were small pools of white water on her windowsills and it was only when touched that she realised it was ash on the top. She's also written about how the sky looks but other than that, I dont' think it really had a huge impact on her circs.
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On Fri, 28 May 2010 22:42:05 +1000, FarmI wrote:

That's good then. Some news reports had mentioned Scotland as being affected.
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wrote in message

I've also been posting in misc.rural for years. But I've not noticed this 'wallace' poster there before which is why I had a chuckle at the troll comment (who's the troll: the one who's posted for years or a suddenly new name?). Wallace can't be very 'rural' if s/he has not seen the way irrigation is used as per the pic in the cite I gave. Mind you many of the posters in misc.rural aren't what I'd call 'rural'.
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FarmI wrote:

It's just too much work and the land has to be fairly flat. We had a few when I was a kid. One thing I remember was the varmints digging and causing leaks in the ditch. I had relatives in Idaho who used a lot of siphon tubes. I think the water came from the Snake River. They had some tubes as large as 4" diameter for pasture irrigation. Pivot irrigation is by far the most common. Some farmers are trying subsurface irrigation. Gated pipe is still fairly common.
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Siphon tubes was how we irrigated when I was a kid. I think the tubes were bigger then 4" tho. Or it could have been just that I was pretty little then.
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