ID this type of farm BRIDGE, please

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On Wed, 02 Jun 2010 12:07:22 -0700, Billy wrote:

You're suggesting that to me because _______? It would have been more appropriate to suggest it to Farm1 if you think she is the only one from rec.gardens (other than you) participating in the thread. I have restored rec.gardens to the group list for this post as I don't know if Farm1 is currently subscribed to m.r.
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On Wed, 02 Jun 2010 17:41:07 -0700, Billy wrote:

No, you still don't have it right. If you'd spent a few minutes at groups.google.com before you dug yourself in deeper, you'd have found that the OP had never posted to misc.rural before.
If you're bored (or whatever) with the thread, kill filter it instead of hassling people in another ng; the OP was a "third party" whose "home" is Google Groups.
I am again restoring rec.gardens to the groups list. This time, so other participants will be aware that they have a self-appointed group moderator.
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Ann wrote:

[....]
I always get a big kick out of someone making any attempt to control or recommend changes to my decisions pertaining to my cross posting.
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wrote:

I was just trying to bring out the "Truth, Justice, and the American Way" in you, but I see that I've hit unadulterated troll.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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Well I can see your point out the position of this hypothetical ram, but to go along with that, I'd have to ignore what farmers do in real life which is to go with the most practiacl solution to save themselves time both in the build and in the maintenance.
If there is a perfectly good flat platform on which to put a pump why go to the trouble of rigging up a way of suspending an hydraulic ram below such a structure? A platform out the side may be a possibility but I'd say from the new pics that it's always been used the way it is shown. Probably bought cheap in some sort of clearance sale by whoever had it originally for whatever they had it for originally.

Ah! I see what you mean! My first thought was about that bridge not being a site for a ram. So, yes, I did mean "Nope" was in reference to the structure being used to hold a ram.
I don't believe that bridge held a ram and now I've seen more pics, I'm even more of that view. But as I think you're poitning out, since I don't believe that bridge held a ram, then my nope must also refer to a ram (but it was the bridge that I was thinking about).
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wrote in message

to make it work better (or at all)?
A platform out the side may be a possibility but I'd say from

From the new pics it looks like what I said long ago - the motor was mounted on the bridge and the pump itself placed in the water.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 12:05:51 +1000, FarmI wrote:

I'm not going to argue with that, since 5/26 I posted: "Consider the possibility that "your" bridge was repurposed from its original use/location. As those bridges were phased out, some were probably free for the taking." <g>

OK ... I think.
Since we are discussing water, how did your summer go water-wise?
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OK - not brilliant but enough although it was a bit touch and go at times. Not a lot of pasture growth but we didn't have to buy in feed and there was enough water for the cattle to drink on both farms. We were getting a bit worried about having to sell all the cattle on our other farm as we were getting low on water there and the creek dried up. Luckily the dams stayed full enough till we got decent rain.
Luckily for us and all the other farmers round here there was good Autumn rain over much of the country and especially out west where they'll have feed for the next 18 months on the strength of the Autumn rains. The annual Autumn calf sales resulted in a bumper sale all round. It's been years since we've had such good prices.
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On Tue, 08 Jun 2010 19:10:47 +1000, FarmI wrote:

That's good news. It's traditionally dry here in August. Way back when, the well at my grandparent's house would usually dry up, so they'd bring water down from the better well at the barn in milk cans. Good example of keeping ones priorities straight.
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1. it has not been established that this is, in fact, an irrigation ditch (probably initially constructed as a drainage ditch) or its characteristics.
2. Nobody, until now, mentioned that the hydraulic ram was itself located on top of the bridge deck. It was said the bridge could have "held" a hydraulic ram. Just like it could hold a pump IN the water.
3. your "nope" sounded as if you were disagreeing with the described nature of a hydraulic ram.
sounds like you are changing your story again.
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It might be established by you that it's one of those canals on Jupiter.

It might also have 'held' a flying saucer in the ditch.

Your comments sound like you're a whiner.

Sounds like you still have no idea about hydraulic rams.
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Thanks again for responding Billy as I just can't see his posts. But I did know what he meant about the inlet pipe without having to do a google. Effectively he'd described how to obtain that drop into the ram so I knew what he was referring to.
Harry thinks a 'normal person' wouldn't see that as a drop, but I know that you'd know my background well enough to know that I'm quite normal in the rural Australian sense but probably not in an urban or American sense. Having seen so many silly questions online such as can someone drink rainwater, or drink water collected off a roof or (grasp!!) even use it on vegetables, I'm always stunned at such lack of awareness of water and it's provision to house, animals and garden.
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Obviously, there has to be some kind of "drop" or the stream wouldn't flow and it would only be a long, narrow, stagnant pond.
But if it has any kind of flow it's possible to run a pipe upstream and, if necessary, construct a small "dam" to concentrate the flow into your ram inlet. The ""dam" would only have to be, say, 6" high!
What matters to the ram isn't necessarily the "head" (which may only be a few inches) but the amount of the flow, and the diameter and length of the inlet pipe.
That's the "MAGIC" of the hydralic ram: it can derive some useful work (namely pumping water "uphill" from 6' to 20') from a so-so stream that most folks would consider useless for power generation purposes.
Obviously, the greater the "head" at the inlet pipe entrance, the easier it is to get a significant flow going and the large the hydralic ram can be and the more water you can pump.
I have only seen ONE hydralic ram in actual use. It was in Western NC. I was visiting the family home of a then girlfriend and her dad was interested in them. He took me to the home of someone he knew and he showed off his pump. The "stream" was small but seemed to have a good flow. I don't remember how long the inlet pipe was. Anyway, the pump kept operating 24/7 and keep a water tank above the level of the house filled. IOW: this guy had running water without using any electric power. The total lift was on the order of 15' to 20' from the stream bed.
BTW: my girl friend's fanukt house was about half way up what they called a "mountain." They got their water from a spring located some 100' up the slope and some 20' higher in elevation. Thus, they too had running water without needing any kind of pump. In the winter, to keep it from freezing they simply let the water run 24/7.

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Yes, obviously.

Yes, but we're revisiting old ground now. If you have another look at the pics again and think about how far back you'd need to run a pipe to even get a 6 inch head above a ram if it was perched on the top of the bridge. The situation Harry mentioned of the ram on the side of the stream might be possible at a pinch, but I still can't see it as being possible for sitting on the structure in that sort of irrigation channel.
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Wait till they find out what's on the meat in the market ;O)
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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<plonk>
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Please describe the stream (or whatever) you have available.
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Odd. My neighbor back when I was kid supplied his entire household and livestock with one. There was no "drop into the ram" - it ran purely on the stream flow. I realize I am wasting my time but...
A ram operates by a stream of water in a pipe suddenly being stopped by a valve. the resultant surge compresses air in the champer which pushes a small amount of the water into the discharge pipe through a check valve. Vavlves reset and the flow is reastablished only to be stopped again. Wash, rinse, repeat. It does not pump much water each cycle but it operates 24/7. A cycle repeats every few seconds.
You could look it up on the 'net. Harry K
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Bob Noble wrote:

Belt driven powered by an electric motor. Maybe the overhead part is used to pull the pump up to clean the debris that accumulates.
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Bob Noble wrote:

Yes exactly. It sure looks like a big ass electric motor on the left with a cover over the belt drive part of the pump on the right. Looks like electrical conduit going to the electric motor, although the setup looks older than conduit, it may have been upgraded at one time.
Like others said, the bridge itself was probably used and moved the this location since it's probably 10 or more times stronger than it needed to be.
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