ID this type of farm BRIDGE, please

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What is this bridge for, exactly? Here it is, from both sides:
http://personal.morris.umn.edu/~webbrl/blog/SundeBridge1.jpg
http://personal.morris.umn.edu/~webbrl/blog/SundeBridge2.jpg
Some info: 1. It's old (obviously). Boards (for walking across) seem too rotted to hold much weight. 2. I don't think it's wide enough for a tractor to drive across, but it's obviously not just for human foot traffic, right? 3. The ditch of water beneath it is maybe 10-15 feet wide. I think it's a man-made tributary from the Chippewa River. It seems to run neatly along the boundaries of farm quarter sections in the area. The bridge seems to connect two farms across the water.
Was the water used for irrigation, do you think? What role did the bridge play? Thanks if you can help (or direct me to another source).
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Looks like a pulley bridge where only one side is opened up (by pulling one side up into the air) to let traffic (boats) through.
There's probably a hundred and one things that the water was used for but since it was made to open, the water was definitely a pathway to bigger waters. Most likely dug wider and deeper by man to help accumudate irragation for the two farms.
Donna in WA who is just guessing.....
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On 05/25/2010 04:21 PM, MNRebecca wrote:

It's an interesting structure. Would it be possible to get more pictures, possibly directly down the bridge, from end to end?
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On Tue, 25 May 2010 14:21:04 -0700, MNRebecca wrote:

Pipeline bridge?
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MNRebecca wrote:

That looks like a canal for transporting small barges... often they would be spanned by variously configured Bascule bridges... used for foot, cart, and livestock traffic. The one you depicted is probably no longer used.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bascule_bridge
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It looks more to me like that is a bridge used to support a big pump for some kind of irrigation. Note the pump in the middle with the overhead to rise the pump.
--
Bob Noble
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I suspect that the "bridge" served to hold a "hydralic ram" which uses the velocity of the water to pump a small portion of the water to the level of the surrounding fields.
OR, it could just be a structure to hold a water turbine is the center of the stream.
The structure in the middle tooks like something used to pull something normall in the stream bed to the level of the bridge floor for maintenance.
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Nope. Hydraulic rams need a head of water above the pump so that the water drops into the ram. - its the action of the water falling into the ram that makes the pumping happen.
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Nope, yourself.
You just don't understand how a hydralic ram operates.
It uses the kinetic energy of a stream to raise a small portion of water well above the level of the stream.

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John, you are wasting your time.
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I do but I'd love to see a cite that would prove me wrong. I have a use for such a beast.

A stream can certainly be used to do that with a hydraulic ram but the stream must allow the water to drop into the ram not just flow past it gently like the water does in a slow moving irrigation channel.
I'd certainly be very interested to see a pic of any hydraulic ram that works as you say it will. I can't see how a slow moving stream can make use of the water hammer effect that gives the 'ram' its name but I'd certainly like to know more details. Can you post a cite please.
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The system I referred to sat right on the edge of the stream. The stream was a 'gentle one'. The input pipe ran a distance up the stream so I guess you could say 'dropping into the ram'. Yes, there has to be an elevation difference but there is no "dropping into the ram' in any sense the normal person would use.
You could look it up on the 'net.
Harry K
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In article

Ah, ya got 'em runnin' now ;O)
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Sorry Harry K but I'm tagging onto a response from Billy. (Thanks Billy for responding as otherwise I wouldn't have seen this) I have not ever seen any post from you Harry on this subject but your comment suggests that you have written something on this before. I have seen no other post from you other than this reply from Billy.
As I mentioned earlier, a stream can indeed be used to operate a ram. And indeed it can be used in just the way you describe. But as I also wrote there MUST be a drop. That drop does not have to be like a mini waterfall immediatley above the ram. It can as you mention come from a considerable distance upstream (usually by pipe) to allow for the drop into the ram. Any 'normal person' with half a brain cell should be able to figure out that water flowing to a ram downstream from an intake pipe forms a 'drop'. And a 'drop' there must be (at least there must be a drop unless they have inveneted something new that no longer operate using water hammer principles)
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Aha. The post I was replying to read like you were saying there had to be something like a mini waterfall.
I dunno why you can't see my post. Perhaps you have me kill filed?
Harry K
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In article

And if you were an honorable man, you would give a citation to make your point, instead of saying, "Go look it up." As it stands, it appears that your pulling your information out of your back side.
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"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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I never said any such thing!!!! But in an odd way, you have hit the nail on the head as to why the bridge could never have been used for a hydraulic ram (more below).
A 'head' of water can be provided by a pipe bring the water some distance as we've both already agreed. It CAN also be provided by a waterfall or even a header tank (not that I mentioned any means of how the drop was achieved to the ram despite what you erroneously thought).
But to go back to that bridge which is high above an irrigation channel. As you probably know, irrigation channels are a body of slow moving water and they are on very gently slope. Just how far upstream do you think the inlet pipe would need to be to provide a head for a hydraulic ram situated that high above the water on that particular bridge? That bridge never held any ram because as we both know, there needs to be that 'drop'. How many miles would a pipe have been run back up that irrigation channel to allow a drop to run a ram sitting up on that bridge?

I don't know if I have you kfed or not. I tend to killfile habitual drongos or loonies. Sometimes posts just go missing. It seems to be happening more as time goes on and ISPs are getting funny about usenet.
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On Wed, 02 Jun 2010 18:31:51 +1000, FarmI wrote:

Referring to the photo, I disagree with "high above".
http://personal.morris.umn.edu/~webbrl/blog/SundeBridge2.jpg
One of the puzzling things about the possibility of it having been used as a conventional bridge is that it was set down into cuts in the banks.
Also, the previous exchange in context was:
John Gilmer wrote: "I suspect that the "bridge" served to hold a "hydralic ram" which uses the velocity of the water to pump a small portion of the water to the level of the surrounding fields."
Farm1 replied: "Nope. Hydraulic rams need a head of water above the pump so that the water drops into the ram. - its the action of the water falling into the ram that makes the pumping happen."
Part of the reason I interpreted your "drops" and "falling" literally was that you were explicitly disagreeing ("Nope") with what John G wrote.

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Well you may disagree but it'd be at least 4 ft to the top of a hydraulic ram situated on that bridge.

Am I now missing posts from you too? I haven't seen anything from you about how you were interpreting what I wrote, but if you'd asked I'd have told you that "Nope" was in reference to the structure being used to hold a ram.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 00:03:38 +1000, FarmI wrote:

Except ... it's the bridge you refer to as being "... high above an irrigation channel." It's unknown whether the hypothetical ram was situated on the bridge or suspended from it.

My participation in the thread had been about the OP's and other bridges, not pumps/hydraulic rams. So, you didn't miss any (previous) post of mine in which I commented on hydraulic rams.
Now, I am confused. Are you saying you meant the "Nope" to refer to the bridge?
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