ID plant with beautifull leaves

Last autumn I went for a week-end on the mountains. Walking through the woods, near the hotel, I found some beautiful strange trees. They had something of magic cause of their long branches and their apparently cut, veryyellow leaves.
This afternoon exploring internet I have found, in a web site, a little picture with these strange, very yellow, leaves. Looking them, I have just remembered my last autumn week-end in the forest and so I would like to know their name to buy some of these trees for my garden. This is the link conducting to the leaf: http://www.agrolinker.co.uk/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.pl?board=9 Thanks in advance, Freddy
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Freddy Artichoke wrote:

I would guess Tulip Tree: http://www.iloveny.com/fall/pages/Tuliptree.html
Neighbor (across the street) got a great deal on two, 12 footers a good 5 years back. Things are very tall but they never flower, so much for a good deal LOL.
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Neighbor (across the street) got a great deal on two, 12 footers a good

Well, tulip tree! Here there is no one of them. thanks for your answer,
But why don't they flower? Usually do they flower? In which season? Thanks, bye
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Liriodendron tulipifera? That's because they're still too young and too small to flower. Give 'em another ten years or so... then look up for the flowers. When they're older, they'll flower on lower branches.
First flowering for most tulip trees is about 15-20 years old... and then they'll keep going for another 200 or so... A few strains (notably a Florida strain) flower younger than average, but most require some growth.
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Kay Lancaster wrote:

================15 to 20 years! Guess my neighbor has a few more years to wait them :0)
The trees are a nice size though, already taller than their two story house .
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

IIRC, Liriodendron tulipifera is the tallest tree species east of the Mississippi and the tallest deciduous tree in North America. Those trees have a long way to go...
We have some fairly mature Liriodendron on our property, and I only see the flowers when they fall to the ground. Even the lower branches are way up in the woodland canopy.
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I think the biggest recorded L. tulipifera is about 160 ft tall, with a DBH of about 10 ft. No one knows how big the Chinese species will get... it's only been planted in the west since about 1906, and it's pretty rare in China.
There are some white ash, black locust, pignut hickory and American sycamore in about the L. tulipifera size class, as well as some cucumbertree, Magnolia acuminata, a not-terribly-distant relative of Liriodendron.

Sounds like they were heavily shaded or heavily pruned when young.
I used to have to get specimens from a couple of Liriodendron on campus for class... it involved climbing out on the roof of a four story building with a pole pruner, cutting the flowers, and hoping at least a few made it to the ground so I could pick them up.
There are a couple of species of Liriodendron, and a newish hybrid between them... L. tulipifera is the North American species: http://www.arboretum.harvard.edu/plants/cent_trees.html http://www.tva.gov/river/landandshore/stabilization/plants/tulip_poplar.htm L. chinense is the green-flowered species: http://www.asianflora.com/Magnoliaceae/Liriodendron-chinense.htm Best I can find of the flowers is actually on a stamp: http://www.cpi.com.cn/cpi-e/newissue/2006-5.asp
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On 26 Apr 2006 02:42:02 GMT
[]

Thanks Kay for these great links. I've not seen the Arnold website before, and it's a fascinating data base. I'll definitely be consulting before my next visit to Boston!
I'd never even heard of the chinense version of Liriodendron. I do think that many L. tulipifera have green flowers, though. Mine has been in for about 10 years, and doesn't seem particularly fast growing in Normandy. Perhaps too wet, or summers not hot enough to fully ripen wood. No sign of flowers at all yet.
cheers
-E
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Very nice arboretum, from what I've seen of photos (I've not been there)... they have a lot of Asiatic rarities like Davidia involucrata, too.

I've not seen one that doesn't have the orange splash at the bottom, which I've not seen in L. chinense. If you get to the UK, I think most of the big botanical gardens there have L. chinense, too.

Could you possibly have L. chinense there? I understand it tends to be a slower grower.
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On 26 Apr 2006 21:42:07 GMT

Is that a rarity? :) A friend of mine has one growing happily in a tub while he waits for his new house to be built.
Anyway it's a beautiful arboretum with some great collections. Well worth the visit. Some of the maples like A. diabolicum are hard to find anywhere outside of habitat; though I don't doubt there are examples at places like Hergest Croft, and perhaps at Les Barres here in France.

I don't think so; at least it wasn't sold as such and from your links I gather it is tulipifera. I'll let you know about the orange splashes when/if it finally gets around to flowering! :)
I do get up to the UK often enough, so I'll surely keep an eye out for L. chinense, thanks.
-E
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Quite rare in the wild; on the IUCN Red List. L. chinenese is also in the red book, iirc.
Kay
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Kay Lancaster wrote:

The lot is densely wooded, so saplings are almost certainly somewhat shaded when they are young. I doubt anyone has been wandering around the woods pruning the trees. To me, it seems normal for mature woodland trees not to have lots of very low branches, and I like the look of tall straight trunks like pillars in a cathedral..
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That'll do it.

It is, but many second or third (or more!) growth woodlands have had partial clearances for firewood, or tree thinning, or diseases, and you see more low branches. Or you could have someone like my late father on your property... all trees shall be limbed up to a minimum of ten feet or so... <g>
Kay, who's a bit sore today after doing the lawnmower limbo under some of her trees with very low branches...
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