I want an invasive plant!

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Mexican tarragon. Handsome plant, delicious in chicken salad among other places, grows like a weed.
Sword fern. I love fern, but in zone 9B this one is too much of a good thing.
Hardy gloxinia. Striking plant with 2-inch orange tube flowers. More invasive than mint, if that's possible. zemedelec
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Green concrete is the way to go.

any
full
like
walked
off
of
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I would suggest Oregano. It's even growing in the gravel by my driveway. Sue in Mi. (Zone 5)
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Dave
    I'm thinking thyme might be the way to go.     It depends on how much sun there is in this spot.
    Thyme likes sun and well drained soil. Plus it smells rather nice; has purplish flowers in the Summer. You can snip it back if it gets leggy. I don't know how this would stand up to dogs, but I know for sure that cats will go out of their way to avoid walking thru it.
    If it's shady, there is periwinkle (vinca minor) ; very nice bluish flowers in Spring and deep green leaves all Summer.
Have a good one.
Joe Ontario
On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 08:13:37 +1000, "Peter Jason"

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You could try mint or morning glory vine as a groundcover. You could also use an asparagus fern or boston ivy. That should keep you going...
Alain
Peter Jason wrote:

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Vinca minor!
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kind
You can try a mix of seeds to get an eclectic field? Creeping charlie aka ground ivy aka gill o'r the ground - lovely purple flowers in spring early summer. Very invasive mint clover oxalis (wood sorrel or variations - the purple ones are nice) creeping jenny california poppies or any annual reseeding variety of poppy (you can even use the poppy seeds you buy for cooking - nice pink flowers). coriander wild flowers - any kind. Some native plants (should be able to find seeds in any waste area side of the road at this time of year): pearly everlastings fireweed golden rod wild ginger large leaf Aster solomons seal wild roses jewelweed meadow rue violas caraway
Hope this helps Tina
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This fall I plan to plant equisetum in a planter built next to the pool. I am making a larger pond and removing the pond from that planter box. That large stand of horsetail will look beautiful and nothing will fall in the pool.
It's a structurally beautiful, jurassic plant.
Victoria

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steeply
Somebody far more qualified than I relays the following:
My wife has two green thumbs. By osmosis, I would suggest that if you have sufficient sunlight and no permafrost, Lavender is an excellent choice. It grows robustly, stays evergreen mostly, is laden with heady blossoms that bees and butterflies crave and mass for, and, of course, perfumes the ambient air with a soothing undertone reminiscent of white-chiffoned, antebellum ladies sipping mint tea in the gazebo, of a sultry afternoon in Loosianne.
If ye have a moodier climate, Heather would be your pick, then.
Intersperse rosemarie, that woody, versatile, earthy herb. Also, salal,(N.W groundcover, as knickeknick (Chief's smoke). A smoke tree in the center would be good. Eschew English Ivy completely! Muttonfat Ivy's OK, though.
Of course, if you want to let it go native, get a tamer bamboo. That'll fill it up, and quickly. Of course, it'll screen any view behind after five years, or so. Birch trees, (also traveling roots), are attractive, as is Quaking Aspen.
Those are my top picks for a horticultural island, such as you have described. None require any maintenance, unless you are having a severe drought with temps in excess of, say, 95f over weeks. Then, a bucket o' water every coupla days'll do 'em.
Plant now, with a dash of fish fertilizer in the worked hole, and mulch with bark. Come springtime, voila!
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Sword fern. Once it's established, it never goes away. However if you want to thin it, change its perimeter, etc., it's very easy to pull up. zemedelec
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Take my english ivy. Please, please take it. You'll never have to touch it again. it will take over that section of your yard.... and possibly everything else also.
Susan
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<< Take my english ivy. Please, please take it. You'll never have to touch it again. it will take over that section of your yard.... and possibly everything else also. >><BR><BR>
Certain plants in the South are referred to as "Plant it and run." Not just kudzu, which I don't have, Japanese climbing fern and Cat's claw, which I do, but certain ones grow so fast in the heat and humidity that you wonder if you're going to wake up one night with a tendril around your throat, getting tighter...tighter... zemedelec
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Dave Gower wrote:

> so any

> full

> like it

> walked

> steeply

> off a

> kind of

I have never been across the big puddle, so no idea if this would work - but I like Vinca minor (maagdenpalm in Dutch) - i'll try to fix a pic herewith - it has pretty blue flowers, is evergreen - although, you have variegated versions too - and is just a groundcover that doesn't come any higher than about 6 cm what means you haven't got to trim it like you would have to with grasses or bamboo :) +----------------------------------------------------------------+ | Attachment filename: maagdenpalm.gif | |View attachment: http://www.gardenbanter.co.uk/attachment.php?postid )0893| +----------------------------------------------------------------+ -- Hadewych ------------------------------------------------------------------------ posted via www.GardenBanter.co.uk
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bamboo english ivy st. johns's wort crepe myrtle

http://www.gardenbanter.co.uk/attachment.php?postid )0893|
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add seedum to the list..... also lilies of the valley.....
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On 04 Nov 2003 21:06:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (WARRENRN1) opined:

Crape myrtle is invasive?
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On 04 Nov 2003 21:06:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (WARRENRN1) wrote:

The king of invasive plants Kudzu Visit my website: http://www.frugalmachinist.com Opinions expressed are those of my wifes, I had no input whatsoever. Remove "nospam" from email addy.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Roy) wrote in message (WARRENRN1) wrote:

Why do so many people have reading problem? This guy said he's in Canada!!! The place where snow doesn't melt until summer.
I don't think any plant of one type would look good in a 10x20 area. I'd try a combination of evergreens, shrubs and herbs.
I have a east side facing garden in a slope along the deck in zone 5. I've found the following plants doing very well without maintenance.
--Juniper (nice evergreen, not invasive)
--Yew (Grow and spread quickly. like water and shade, evergreen, easy to propagate. Not invasive)
--Dogwood (beautiful winter color, easy to propagate. Not invasive)
--Sumac (fall color, produces lots of suckers. They may take over the island in a few years. Tons of them along 401. You may get them from your neighbors for free)
--Mint (very invasive, I had to put down 5" plastic edge around to control it. Still green now. Good for Mojito Classic)
--Day lily (Very easy to grow. Not spread as quickly as mint. But after a few years, you'll be willing to give some of them away free of charge to whoever wants them)
--Thyme (Just sow those $0.79 pack seeds from Home Hardware in spring directly into your garden, and they'll grow. Put in the most sunny and dry place in your 10'x20'. Not invasive)
--Snap dragon (Nice long bloom period. Grow directly from seed, and reseed itself every year without your labor. Not invasive)
--French tarragon (Easy to grow, but not invasive. Not recommended unless you want the herb)
The hostas, garden phlox, spindle tree (Control Gold), straw berries grow very well without care. But they may not fit your bill.
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Although the original posts notes that he's in Eastern Ontario, in a Zone 5 area [and judging by his domain, over in the Ottawa area, which most definately has a long, cold winter], Canada is by no means all snow.
The west coast [British Columbia] is temperate rain forest, and doesn't get much colder [if at all, brrrr!] than San Francisco!
cheers!
--
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Depending on your server and how often you are able to get to the group you may be answering Re: (reply) to posts which may have cut to the point of not having the information needed to respond without further information. Basically if you are going to cut (I say this to myself as well) you should leave sufficent information from the original posting for other people to respond as well. So those of us asking "what zone" never saw the original post or following posts with that information (for example I'm responding to a re: to the person complaining about those of us not knowing the zone because THAT post is no longer on my server (and yes I know I could go go yahoo and track things down but I really don't have the time). So my comment to not cutting people slack is - take a breath, lighten up. Life is too short. (I say that to myself as well) DK
wrote:

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