I need help with starting a garden..

Greetings
Lets see where do I start...
Last summer, in an effort to help me get a front yard garden started, my dad bought me 4 plants.. I put them in the front garden, nothing else there and as the month rolled on they seemed to die.. they were planted in new fertilizer and watered... I admit that I don't have much of a green thumb..
Anyways, last week, I was at a banquet and, when the head table told us that the plants were to be given to the ladies at the table, one lady told me to take one of the flowers...
I brought the flower home and the next day I took off the aluminum foil wrap, around the plastice pot, and put the pot on top of a saucer... I poured some water into the plastic pot and some came out onto the saucer.. Each day, since, I have been putting water into the saucer...
Now, my thoughts and here is where I could use some expertise...
When I was in public school, one of our teachers tried to tell us how we could take one flower and make several flowers... She tried to tell us that you can snip one of the flowers, about an inch or two, down the stem, below the flower and transfer this cutting to a glass of water. This way you can watch the roots start to form along the stem...
Is there any truth to this idea... What you do add to the water to help promote the plant's life...
Second thought... My second thought, which I more or less just thought of is this...
Can I remove the plant from the earth, it is current in, shake off the earth, carefully separate each flower and stem from the bulb and then transfer each flower to its own pot.. Each pot would have it's own dirst and saucer etc... Would that work...
Is there a website to show of someone's elses success it doing this...
Any help / suggestions, etc, would be appreciated...
To add to this... this house belonged to my parents that they purchased in 1951...
We / they bought a cottage and the gardens here were left to go.....
I bought the place and am now trying to rejuvenate the gardens... I retired in summer 2003. I tried to rejuevenate the gardens last year but was unsucessfull....
This year I am going to try again....
There is a garden under the front living room window and one rather long one... 4 or 5 feel but 20 feet maybe...
Also a 6 by 6 foot garden my dad used to plant berry bushes and something else.. I can remember the name...
We also have a long hedge but that is a different story...
note... So interest has been in technology, ham radio etc. my interesting in gardening has been next to nill, I am now trying to cultivate a new interest...wish me luck...
Larry
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Good Luck Larry!
Although still a novice I have had some sucess with a flower bed in my front yard & I owe it all to the Sunset Gardening book. Maybe you might enjoy learning about it from that book or another. It seemed so remedial when I considered gardening that a book was just an incidental but I learned so much-enough to realize I did not know anything!
larry wrote:

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news:MH8Ud.1064> >

saucer..
I've midposted...
Lots of questions and topics in your post, but I do think you need to find out "what kind of flower?"! There is nothing special required for gardening success beyond understanding what each plant needs and giving it to them. To do that a proper ID is most necessary.

stem,
way
Again- what kind of flower? The rooting technique you describe works great on some species and not at all on others.

and
Err.... what kind of flower? <g>
Yes it will work and there are many websites describing such things. But if I might suggest that you get a bit of general plant experience under your belt before you attempt such things? The key to getting a plant through a stressful period is in being able to recognize when it is in trouble- and for that experience is best.

First I would think that you need to tell us where you are (in general- Zone??) and what type of garden you think you want. What type of soil is your property? What sun exposure? What rainfall? Any wind or seaspray issues? Has the soil ever been ammended in any way?
A very good start is to take drives through local neighborhoods and see what is generally successful in your area. Next would be a visit to a local library or bookstore to find things written about *your specific Zone*. Look in the "local interest" sections. General advice is just that- general. You are going to need specifics. Spring is upon us- check your local newspaper for local gardening shows- most all cities have them and the area vendors can help you a lot is choosing proper plants for your specific needs.
As I mentioned- all you have to do is educate yourself a bit about your area and what plants do well there. A bit of research at the get go can save you loads of work planting things you don't know anything about or haven't researched thoroughly. Getting a plan together before you buy is much more conducive to success than buying plants and then wandering the yard looking for a place to put them. That only leads to having to move things down the road.
So find your Zone here: http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html then proceed to doing at least a day or two (a month wouldn't be too much) of research into your specific area. Local information is always best- begin by Googling "plants zone__". Remember to hit the bookstore/library for local publications, and browse todays paper for upcoming gardening events.
It is a wonderful hobby!!
Toni Carroll South Florida USA Zone 10
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saucer..
I've midposted...
Lots of questions and topics in your post, but I do think you need to find out "what kind of flower?"! There is nothing special required for gardening success beyond understanding what each plant needs and giving it to them. To do that a proper ID is most necessary.

stem,
way
Again- what kind of flower? The rooting technique you describe works great on some species and not at all on others.

and
Err.... what kind of flower? <g>
Yes it will work and there are many websites describing such things. But if I might suggest that you get a bit of general plant experience under your belt before you attempt such things? The key to getting a plant through a stressful period is in being able to recognize when it is in trouble- and for that experience is best.

First I would think that you need to tell us where you are (in general- Zone??) and what type of garden you think you want. What type of soil is your property? What sun exposure? What rainfall? Any wind or seaspray issues? Has the soil ever been ammended in any way?
A very good start is to take drives through local neighborhoods and see what is generally successful in your area. Next would be a visit to a local library or bookstore to find things written about *your specific Zone*. Look in the "local interest" sections. General advice is just that- general. You are going to need specifics. Spring is upon us- check your local newspaper for local gardening shows- most all cities have them and the area vendors can help you a lot is choosing proper plants for your specific needs.
As I mentioned- all you have to do is educate yourself a bit about your area and what plants do well there. A bit of research at the get go can save you loads of work planting things you don't know anything about or haven't researched thoroughly. Getting a plan together before you buy is much more conducive to success than buying plants and then wandering the yard looking for a place to put them. That only leads to having to move things down the road.
So find your Zone here: http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html then proceed to doing at least a day or two (a month wouldn't be too much) of research into your specific area. Local information is always best- begin by Googling "plants zone__". Remember to hit the bookstore/library for local publications, and browse todays paper for upcoming gardening events.
It is a wonderful hobby!!
Toni Carroll South Florida USA Zone 10
(sorry for the double post- I got my attribution wrong)
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larry Wrote:

Hi Larry,
Please forgive that I haven't included all the quotes and colors of th posts that have responded to you. I know alot about gardening, but ver little about this type of usenet thing, technology or ham radios. :-) I am posting on a forum and that is what I generally do and the forma is different. You have already received some wonderful advice so I'l try not to repeat any of it and attempt to touch on other points.
It will be helpful to you, and those attempting to help you, to kno your plant hardiness zone. To find your zone, here's a zip code zon finder. You should always mention your state and hardiness zone whe posting. http://www.gardenweb.com/zones/zip.cgi
Some other things that are handy for new gardeners to know:
An annual grows from seed, flowers and sets seed and dies in one year.
A perennial will sprout from seed, by runners, offshoots, bulbs or b propagating itself by rooting along the stems. It will usually onl form green growth the first year while developing a strong root syste (for some plants it might do this for 2 or more years) and will liv for many years, even after setting seed it will resprout from the roo system.
A biennial will grow from seed the first year and grow only gree growth while developing roots. The second year it will flower, set seed and die.
As a new gardener (often called a newbie), the most important advise I always give is to pay attention to the soil. Healthy soil will lead to healthier plants that will more easily be able to deal with drought and pests. To do this you need to add lots of organic matter to the soil and mix in. The best organic matter is compost. You can make your own or purchase it in bulk or by the bag. A 3" or 4" layer on top of a new bed is a good place to start. Always mulch the beds after planting and once a year with organic mulch that will retain moisture, help keep soil temps even, keep weeds at bay and help to enrich the soil. Organic mulches like shredded wood mulch, leaf mold (shredded and rotted leaves), pine straw (just pine needles) are good ones. Compost can also be used as a mulch and the worms will bring it down and mix it for you over time.
Bugs are necessary to pollinate and even clean plants (ex: peonies always have ants on them and keep other bad bugs away). Don't get out the pesticides when you see a bug. Usually there is a good bug predator for most bad bugs. Know thine enemy. There are sites where you can look up which bug is which.
The right plant for the right place is also very important. You don't want to put a plant that needs good drainage and wants full sun in a moist or wet shady place. Remember that full sun is 6 hours or more, part shade is 4 to 6 hours and shade is 2 hours or less. When in doubt and you can't get an answer, contact your local extension service for answers.
http://ceinfo.unh.edu/state_sites.html
Go to the library and look at books on gardening. Many have a plant encyclopedia in the back to help you identify plants and learn their growing needs. There's lots on the web too. Read through lots of posts on forums and try and learn from other gardeners. If you would like some informative forums where you can read and learn I will be happy to give you some links as well. In the meantime these should get you started. For this first one, click on the topics in the green box on the left titled 'Outdoors'.
http://tinyurl.com/3tv9b http://www.backyardgardener.com/etera /
You can research plants at www.google.com It's best to use the Latin or botanical name, but if you don't have it you can search with the common name, and when you find the botanical name, you can use that to get more info. You can even click on 'Images' at google and often get photos as well. Another way to search is with quotes and a plus sign like this:
Georgia + "invasive plant"
There are many sites with info on pruning and how to plant trees and shrubs. There are also sites about native plants and their value, especially for a new gardener. Native plants tend to be more resistant to pests and diseases and are usually more carefree. As you learn more you will know which sites you want and need to see.
If you would like sites for any of the topics I've mentioned or need more specific info, feel free to ask. Since you mentioned a hedge I'm thinking you might want a site on how to maintain and prune. Again, just let me know and I'll be happy to give you some. In the meantime, here's some sites on propagating plants that you will want to save. Do keep in mind that it's not good to propagate with cuttings when plants are in bloom. The plant is putting it's energy into producing flowers for the purpose of producing seeds. You can snip off the blooms on the plants when you are ready to propagate.
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_MG108 http://tinyurl.com/5mayd http://www.landspro.com /
Another book I'd like to suggest is 'The Well Tended Perennial Garden: Planting & Pruning Techniques' by Tracy Disabato-Aust and Steven M. Still.
As to your question about the potted plant, I agree with the other poster that knowing what plant it is will tell you what you can do to propagate it. If you don't know the name, even the common one, maybe you can find it in one of the books that have been suggested. You do mention that it's a bulb. Are you certain of this? If so, you may be able to separate it, but it would still be best to know which plant it is.
Good luck, Larry! Newt
--
Newt


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The plastic label that was stuck between the flowers was labelled 'primrose'... is that of any help? I am a Canadian and live in the west Lake Ontario area... Larry

dad
and
thumb..
that
to
and
retired
interesting
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larry Wrote:

I would need to know the names of these plants and the sun condition to help.

There are many different types of primrose (known botanically a Primula) but I suspect that the one you have is a hardy one -Primul vulgaris - English Primrose. It's considered a 'Hardy Primrose'. O the hardy ones there are bog types and rock and cliff types. If thi is your plant, it is a rock and cliff type. Is this it? http://tinyurl.com/5cd3z
If that is your plant, it can be propagated by division, offset (babies that come up next to parent) or from seed. It's a difficul one to propagate from seed, so your best bet would be division. suspect the plant isn't old enough to give you divisions yet. Take look here. http://tinyurl.com/4g77h
From this site: http://www.botany.com/primula.html "PROPAGATION - Hardy Primulas: Seeds should be sown as soon as they'v been harvested. If sown immediately, they'll usually sprout quite well If they're kept for only a few weeks before sowing they will take muc longer to germinate; they will come up irregularly over a long period The seeds should be planted in pots or pans filled with sifted loam leaf mold or peat moss and sand. After potting, water them well an place them in a shady, north-facing cold frame or other shaded spot Keep them covered with a sheet of glass and a piece of paper. As soo as they are big enough to handle, pluck them out and grow in the usua way. If the seeds haven't germinated by autumn, the pans can be place in a shady spot in the open, exposed to frost and snow all winter. Thi will help germination and they'll usually pop up after the pans ar transferred to a frame in the spring. When dealing with the seeds o rare and valuable Primulas, hope for germination should not b abandoned before 18 month or 2 years. The English Primrose (P vulgaris) and P. auricula and their varieties can also be increased b dividing them as soon as they've finished flowering or by offsets."
I also suspect that you are watering too much. I'd say to let the to inch of the soil dry to the touch before you water again. If yo decide to put pebbles in the saucer under the pot, don't let the plan sit in the water.
"POTTING - Hardy Primulas: The rock and cliff dwelling Primulas gro the best in rock gardens in loamy soil that has good drainage and neve becomes too dry. Leaf mold, sand and a bit of limestone or rubble adde would be beneficial."
New
-- Newt
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