I'll get those pesky squirrels .............

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When the first robins arrive my lawn looks invaded by zillions of worm hunters. When I mow masses of swallows swarm all about my tractor. The only bird feeding I do is a few slices of bread for the pair of Canada geese that come to my deck three times a day, and very occasionally wild turkeys come by for a snack... they like dry cat food. There is no need for bird feeders in rural areas. Even in winter birds find plenty of food, and even at temps below zero water still flows in culverts under roadways where deer hoofs break up surface ice where they exit from below ground and there are lots of openings around beaver dams... plus there is always food and water at all the many livestock farms. And the squirrels aren't existing on my few peanuts alone... just yesterday I walked into my Norway spruce windbreak to check the gauge on my 500 gallon propane tank that's hidden in there and there hidden from view are *mountains* of cones and seed husks...squirrels are very neat, they pile their debris very uniformly, cones to the left, husks to the right.
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This morning, I had lazuli buntings, canyon wrens, American goldfinches and grosbeaks. The most color I've seen in months.
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Got another this morning.
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"Plague is a zoonotic disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. In 2006, a total of 13 human plague cases have been reported among residents of four states: New Mexico (seven cases), Colorado (three cases), California (two cases), and Texas (one case). This is the largest number of cases reported in a single year in the United States since 1994."
to make matters worse multidrug resistant plague bacteria have been found in the US. INgrid

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On 4/25/2009 8:13 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

I'm a docent at a showcase garden. I'm there every Tuesday morning and Saturday afternoon. After I wrote the above, I went to the garden for my Saturday shift.
Near the garden's resource center are two large white mulberry trees (Morus alba), that seem to be late leafing out this spring. During my shift today, I watched a squirrel running up and down the bare branches of one of these trees, devouring all the little green shoots. No wonder the branches are bare!
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/ .
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On Sat, 25 Apr 2009 17:47:03 -0700, "David E. Ross"

If they had a better food source, would they harm the mulberry?
Kate
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On 4/25/2009 7:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notme.com wrote:

The showcase garden is in an urban area, directly across the street from city hall (city has a population of ~127,000). On the same side of the street as the garden, there is a neighborhood shopping mall on one side and an up-scale steak house on the other. On the street behind are apartments and small houses.
The garden is not intended to be a lunch buffet for rodents. It's intended to be a showcase of garden design concepts from different parts of the world.
Let someone else feed the squirrels . . . and put up with squirrel crap.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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you dont understand reproduction? squirrels crank out more than one litter per years and after a while there are simply too many squirrels for the amount of "wild" food and the amount of natural living spaces. then they begin eating their way into houses (made of wood much like trees) and eating everything in sight. at some point the population explosion has to be thinned out to reasonable levels. in my case it is NOT MY HOUSE, NOT MY FRUIT TREES.
Ingrid

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On Sun, 26 Apr 2009 10:31:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

I do understand reproduction. I also understand loss of habitat, human overpopulation and caring for the world in general, not just my species. Obviously you see things differently. IMO, we humans are the responsible ones if nature is unbalanced and it's up to us to come up with responsible solutions. My idea of responsible doesn't involve extermination.
Kate - but then I enjoy squirrels

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What you don't and are obviously incapable understanding is unlike humans squirrel parents kick their offspring out of the family home as soon as they are able to fend for themselves, they move on to other parts never again to return to the area where they were born... squirrel parents do not support their adult offspring.
then they begin eating their way into

Squirrels can only enter the homes of the pinheaded imbeciles who don't properly maintain their homes.

Squirrel populations do not increase past what their environment can sustain... any extras are culled out by their natural preditors, some years at a slightly higher rate than they reproduce... squirrel populations, as with most mammilian wildlife, remain very stable or decrease, rarely do mammal populations in the wild increase.

Typical tenant, doesn't give a shit about other's property... and hasn't the common sense of a rodent... I'll bet you're still sponging off your parents, and whoever else, including the tax payers. The only reason that wildlife can take up residence in homes is because lame brained people permit them access.
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You're never going to trap them all. The only sane solution is to protect things like the grain. How about storing it in clean metal trash cans with the lids strapped with bungee cords? If you think they'll chew the bungee cords, use chain. If they continue chewing on the shed until they figure out it's pointless, call a siding company and have them wrap the vulnerable areas in aluminum.
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Killing them with these simple devices is far cheaper, and far more effective. Plus the damages they do in lessened numbers is cost effective.
Steve
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Is there a reason you haven't tried a Havahart trap? You'll obviously have to dispatch the squirrels somehow after you trap them, but there are lots of imaginative ways to do that.
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I used a Tin Cat for the mice, but you have to handle them too much. I just tossed the Tin Cat in a 5 gallon bucket of water for three minutes. Now I take them out with a large metal spoon and fling them like a lacrosse toss into the chasm that borders our property for the raptors to have free lunch. Setting and resetting HavAHarts every day is a pain, not to mention cost times three or six.
Steve
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Oh well. Whatever method you use, it'll make you feel like you're being successful.
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You have no earthly comprehension of how your approval has made me feel.
Steve
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Steve, you must be new to gardening if you think you'll beat the squirrels using traps. You may get a one week respite from the attacks, but more will come next week.
Read what brooklyn suggested a few minutes ago.
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Joe, you really need to bone up on your reading comprehension. What these are is barrels of water. They work 24/7. They don't need resetting. They don't need maintenance. They don't need monitoring.
I put one out last evening at dusk. I just checked them at 5PM, and I had four.
I am going to buy two new barrels and put the in the other problem areas.
Steve
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You need to bone up on the reality of squirrels. You can drown them all day long, but there will be more next week or the week after.
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Still, it makes me feel better than just watching them raid my garden and trees.
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