How to start my Philodendron?

I took the plant out of the pot in order to clean away the white slime accumuating near the rim.
The plant is about 30 years old and hearty. I cut the stems in about half, and placed the new stems in a glass of water.
Does anyone know how long it's gonna take new roots to arrive? And I left a diagonal cut on the raw stems intead of square. Is this the right thing to do? Many thanks.
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You done just right. Should get tiny roots in a week. This is actually a garden place. Expect shouts from some of the locals.
cheers
oz, overwhelmed by the seed catalogs
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wrote:

Thanks oz, like you say I hope im doing everything right. And thanks for letting me know how long to wait before panicking.
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On Fri, 8 Feb 2008 20:23:46 -0500, "WeReo_ScoTTy"

New roots will appear in 2-6 weeks, depending on the environment. Usually roots will start at a node (on the stem). Wait for several roots an inch or so long before you pot them up. Rooting in water is okay, but you get a stronger root system (and a faster growing plant) if you use vermiculite or other rooting medium with a rooting hormone powder.
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I'll look for vermiculite in a store.
Thank you so much.
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On 2/8/2008 5:23 PM, WeReo_ScoTTy wrote:

Generally, rooting in water results in roots that are too easily bruised when potting. I suggest you use a half-and-half mix of peat moss and coarse sand as a rooting medium instead of water. This mix will stay moist without becoming soggy. Also, the peat inhibits fungus and rot. Do not add any nutrients to the mix until after you are sure that there are roots.
While rooting in water is not good if you plant to pot the new plants, it's quite good if you intend to grow the new plants in water. I have a Philodendron growing in water in a large blue glass flask. I just add more water as the water level drops. Once in a great while, I add a teaspoon of extra-diluted runoff from feeding my orchids; this seems to supply all the nutrients needed.
The old plant should get new sprouts, even from leafless stems. The sprouts should grow where there are leaves or used to be leaves.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David E. Ross;774016 Wrote: > On 2/8/2008 5:23 PM, WeReo_ScoTTy wrote:-

>

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That is great advise. David I think that I will definitely want try your approach.
Not only will it save me on potting soil, it will also look so much neater.
And as I can gather you do not risk overwatering the plants OR is that risk still threatening?
What about plants that do not like wet feet??
--
Agapanthus


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On 2/11/2008 11:38 PM, Agapanthus wrote:

Growing Philodendron in water is an old practice suitable even for novices. This is also true of related plants such as pothos (Epipremnum pinnatum) and nephthytis (Syngonium podophyllum). However, it will not work for plants that are accustomed to dry conditions such as succulents and cactii.
See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_potting_mix.html for a do-it-yourself potting mix. Adjust it as indicated for acid-loving plants or for cactus and other succulents. Leave out all nutrients, and it becomes a rooting medium for cuttings, which is what you might need. Also note at my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_start_seeds.html how this can be adapted for starting seeds in a container.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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All this is above my head. Meanwhile I'm worried about the roots that are supposed to grow from the newly cut stems from the mother plant.
The new stems are in a glass of water and are cut in diagonal, like you would cut the stem from a rose. Am I doing the right thing? Can anyone send me any hormones or chemicals you suggest? I'll pay you for them.
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On 2/13/2008 12:16 PM, WeReo_ScoTTy wrote:

You don't need rooting hormone for Philodendron. Just be sure that there is no direct sun on the plant. You should see roots in about 2-3 weeks.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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So far the leaves seem to be holding their own, it's iffy. Ok, thanks.
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