How to get rid of the wax on apples?

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http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/COLUMNNN/nn030929.html "Apples produce their own natural wax coating during growth. This helps them retain moisture after picking. However, many packers wash picked apples with a solvent detergent to remove dirt and pesticide residues that accumulate during growth. This also removes the apple's natural wax coating, leaving the apple susceptible to loss of moisture and eating quality.
To retard this chain of events, many packers coat washed apples with a commercial wax such as Carnauba. Carnauba is an inert product derived from the leaves and buds of the Brazilian wax palm. It's been used in foods since 1900 and, according to FDA's Division of Toxicology, causes no ill effects at levels used."
http://www.bestapples.com/facts/waxing.html "Whether natural or applied, wax may whiten on the surface of fruits or vegetables if they have been subjected to excessive heat and/or excessive moisture. This whitening or chalky appearance is similar to that of a candy bar when you place it in the freezer.
Research has shown that apple waxing prevents moisture loss, enhances firmness retention and slows down the apple respiration rate.
In the most recent study conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service Laboratory in Wenatchee, Wash., Red Delicious apples from Controlled Atmosphere (CA) storage were held at room temperature for eight days (duplicating how apples are treated in grocery stores). The unwaxed apples lost firmness faster than the waxed apples.
A second study showed the waxed apples also had less weight loss after eight days at room temperature. Research horticulturists from the USDA report "the use of wax on Red Delicious apples improved firmness and color, and reduced weight loss."
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I didn't claim there was a problem with the wax. Without it, we would not have decent apples 3-6 months after the harvest. I take issue with your claim that pesticides magically adhere to the wax and are flushed harmlessly out of your body. That's simply ridiculous. Furthermore, even if it were true, it would do nothing with regard to systemic pesticides. I'm sure you know what those are, right?
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Perhaps, if you were to concentrate?
Try talking to the wall. You might get a better response. I have no intentions of continuing to talk to a self-admitted arse, like you.
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Translation: In the face of facts, you have no option but to descend to insulting people. There are clones like you all over the newsgroups. Fortunately, this game is really easy.
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I don't understand all this discussion about commercially grown apples. I thought this was a gardening forum for people who want to grow their own stuff.
Sherwin D.
Doug Kanter wrote:

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sherwindu wrote:

Well thanks to cross-posting, this thread is also in sci.med.nutrition.
Apparently, it was started by someone paranoid about wax on commercially grown apples. There is absolutely nothing unhealthy about eating a commercially grown apple from the USA.
All apples naturally have wax on them.
Historically, just one person died around 1920 from pesticide contamination. Since then commercially grown apples have been washed in order to remove all contact contamination from pesticides on the skin of apples. A safe wax made from palm trees is then added in order to replace the natural wax that was washed off during the cleaning process.
If anything the wax on apples documents that it is perfectly safe and healthy to eat. And, when properly handled this wax does NOT turn white. White spots on apples, documents that those apples wont stored properly. A fact that you would think that health conscience individuals would want to know about. Why would anybody want to buy white spotted apples, any more than a bunch of dark green bananas?
As usual, a bunch of trolls have tried to turn a non-issue into an issue. -- -- John Gohde, Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!
The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is a biological factor of the mind-body connection. Now, weighing in at 18 web pages, the Nutrition of a Healthy Diet is with more documentation and sharper terminology than ever before. http://naturalhealthperspective.com/food /

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Que mierda....
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They are very red but not at all delicious.
--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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Dish liquids contain surfactants that are chosen principally as oil-in-water emulsifiers. They are *not* wax solvents, and are only OK wettng agents. And although when dissolved in water they have good wetting properties, their surface and interfacial tensions are too high to form an aqueous "sheet" of liquid on a paraffin wax surface, let alone polyethylene, which is easier to wet than paraffin.
There is at least one product on the market that is formulated as a food grade wetting agent rather than as an oil-in-water emulsifier. I've tested one of them on red delicious apples and it worked quite well: Earth Friendly Products 'Fruit & Vegetable Wash'. Ingredients: water, surfactant, citric acid http://www.ecos.com /
Obviously the manufacturer is very secretive about the name of the surfactant used in the formulation. Certainly they did not invent that surfactant either. I have some hunches about the possible surfactants that it could be. I know quite a bit about them.
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It's odd though, how well they work at removing the wax, although the brush is an equal partner in this process. Believe me when I tell you that the was *IS* removed. If you'd like to repeat the experiement, be sure to use Dawn dish liquid, original verson.
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Just did some quick research. Apples are washed clean of dust and agricultural surface contamination before they are coated. The type of wax used on apples is not paraffin, which is derived from petroleum, but carnauba, which comes from the leaf of a particular species of Brazilian palm tree (Copernica cerifera). The carnauba is dissolved in a solvent named morpholine, which functions as a coupling agent between organic and aqueous systems. Thus the solution of carnauba in morpholine is miscible in water, which enables the wax coating to be applied by an aqueous spray at room temperature or via an aqueous dip bath. The liquid coating is dried quickly by hot air treatment. All of the aforemented steps are done via a multi-step automated process, without human contact.
I can now understand how Dawn Original can be helpful in removing the coating, as carnauba is easier to wet than paraffin. However, I've tested some inferior brands of fruit/vegetable spray cleaners for the consumer market, and even some of these dedicated use products were unable to produce "sheet wetting" on a coated apple. I didn't bother to further test them via scrubbing, as I want a cleaner that I could simply spray on and rinse off, without much labor.
Apparently there are trace amounts of morpholine residue in the predominately carnauba coating. However I think the main health hazard is not the morpholine, but the contamination from human contact which occurs when: 1) apples are loaded into the store bins and 2) are inspected/handled by customers.
Certainly it is best to completely completely strip away the wax coating rather than clean the surface of that coating, as not only would the morpholine trace be removed, but also whatever contaminates that have been trapped *into* the soft coating while the apples were in the store.
Whenever I see the smaller cheaper apples that are prebagged in plastic by the grower or silo, I choose those. I figure that they must be cleaner than individually displayed apples. Costco stores now offer large premium quality apples at sharply discounted prices that are sold in clear plastic clamshell packaging. But if not for the fact that my area also has a waste-to-energy plant ("burn plant" for generating electricity) I would never buy those.
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