How to get rid of the wax on apples?

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The best example is with red delicious apples purchased at your local grocery store. The apples have whitish areas/stains on the outside skin, and on red apples the white stains are especially visible. It is difficult to remove the stains even when trying to rub them off under running water. When soaked in water for 10 mins the whitish areas become even more visible. I assume they are wax, and the type of wax used on apples supposed to be water soluble and easily removable and these stains one is NOT. I do not want to eat apples with pesticides and other dirt under the wax.
These stains are on apples no matter where you buy them. Is there any way to remove the wax quickly and reliably? Does it make sense to peel each apple?
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It's easy to remove. Get yourself a fingernail brush that you'll use just for fruits & vegetables. Put a drop or two of dish soap on the brush and scrub, then rinse (obviously). It won't hurt the apple, but it will remove the wax. Besides seeing that it's gone, you'll notice that the skin suddenly has an apple smell.
I agree with you about the pesticides, but the wax is a good thing. Without it, it's unlikely any domestically grown apples would last more than a month or three. Red Delicious have a thicker skin, and might go well without wax, but they're only good for cattle feed, so who cares?
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this works, although i use a washrag & not a brush. one should remember that apples also have a natural waxy coating on the skin, in addion to that which is applied for storage. my guess is that the whitish area on the skin is the natural wax bloom under the artificially applied wax. the bloom would get larger if the apple was soaking.

geez Doug, it's bad enough you hate dogs. now you want to subject poor innocent cows to the abomination that is a Delicious apple? you evil, twisted man! ;) the only use for a Delicious apple is starting a compost pile... lee
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Delicious apples are also good ballast for florists' fruit baskets - they keep the baskets stable so they don't tip over and damage the worthwhile fruit, if any. :-)
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They may not taste as good as other apple varieties, but AFAIK red delicious skins contain a far greater concentration of the antioxidant flavonoid named quercetin, than does any other variety of apple. This is also true of red onions with respect to yellow/white varieties.
Other important sources of quercetin: black/green teas, cranberry, red wine, brocolli, kale, spinach, whole buckwheat flour, undutched cocoa powder
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Any of those things taste much better than red delicious apples.
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Red delicious are still my least favorite apple for flavor, and I used to avoid them for.. I can't remember how far back! It was only after learning of their quercetin content last autumn that I began choosing them once in a while. There are 3 or 4 aspects about them that make them less enjoyable.
My favorite apple is rarely available, and when it is, it is by name only, as the cultivar has been hybridized over the years and bears little resemblance to the one that we loved as kids: Stayman winesap. Although its skin was thick, and dull red, with little natural wax, and with unattractive scaly patches, it was positively the sweetest, crispest apple. They were commonly used for cooking, because many people detested their skin, which is removed for cooked recipes anyway. The modern cultivar of the Stayman winesap usually has been x-bred (possibly with Braeburn, or who know what) for the purpose of looks and to make the skin thinner, resulting in an inferior flavor that I do not prefer over other varieties. I don't think I've found a true original Stayman winesap in well over 10 years.
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oh my ghods, NO! a Cortland is NOT one of those nasty mealy MacIntoshes. ew! how could you *possibly* confuse the two?! a Courtland is crisp, with a tender (but not too tender) skin, & sweet with just the right amount of acid bite. good for eating *and* baking. a MacIntosh is a nasty, mealy, hard skinned apple suitable only for apple sauce. they're just a step up from Red Delicious. lee
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Just judging by the flavour I have always thought that the so-called Delicious apples were manufactured from facial tissues.

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Ha :-) Well, must admit that its been a while since I had one. I'll look for them next time that I'm visiting in NJ later this month, but unlike apples from Wasington and BC, their off-season availability (from controlled atmosphere storage) is hard to come by.
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In New Jersey, your best bet for decent apples at this time of year will likely be a Wegman's store. Their apples come from Fowler Farms, near Rochester, and they go to great lengths to extend their storage quality. You can find one of the NJ stores at www.wegmans.com.
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Knack "enigma" snipped-for-privacy@empire.net wrote in message
Cortlands are grown mostly in NY state. In fact I recall trout fishing a couple times near Cortland, NY; that country is one of the greenest, lushest farmlands I've ever seen. As a kid, I recall Cortland apples as were among the first of the economy apples that were sold prebagged in supermarkets. I wonder whether they're simply McCintosh that are graded smaller in size and resold as a different variety! No, they're unavailable where I now live; in eastern Washington.
oh my ghods, NO! a Cortland is NOT one of those nasty mealy MacIntoshes. ew! how could you *possibly* confuse the two?! a Courtland is crisp, with a tender (but not too tender) skin, & sweet with just the right amount of acid bite. good for eating *and* baking. a MacIntosh is a nasty, mealy, hard skinned apple suitable only for apple sauce. they're just a step up from Red Delicious. lee -- war is peace freedom is slavery ignorance is strength 1984-George Orwell
Ha :-) Well, must admit that its been a while since I had one. I'l look for them next time that I'm visiting in NJ later this month, bu unlike apples from Wasington and BC, their off-season availability (fro controlled atmosphere storage) is hard to come by.
i think everyone has their likes and dislikes of certain kinds o apples. we have an apple tree in our front yard that is supposed t grow 5 different kinds on one tree but so far the only apples we hav had are golden delicious. they are really firm and surprisingly sweet we are hoping that more grow on the tree this year :). yup i know som people are going eeeeewwwww but here we eat a lot of different kinds o fruits and just love them including other kinds of apples. but i a still really happy to have the ones that we have been blessed wit whether we have a few or a lot its still nice to have them. enjoy you apples everyone. cyaaaaa, sockiescat
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Courtlands are one of my favorites too. But my DH says MacIntoshes right off the tree are even better than courtlands, harder, crisper. They just dont store at all. Courtlands, of course, store magnificently well. Our frig in the basement was specifically used to store our Courtlands and we ate them most of the winter. by spring they were only good for pies and such and then we started using up the greenings. Ingrid

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How to get rid of the wax on apples?
Eat the apples!!!
The wax absorbs any surface pesticides on the apples and passes out of your body undigested.
Just thought that you might want to know.
Umh, .... yummy. :)
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I'm really going to need to see some reliable information to back up that claim.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

Have fun looking for it.
Cheers ...
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expounded:

Trolling, trolling, over the bounding maine.........
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Ann wrote:

You guys don't write my pay check.
Most of your guys don't have a clue about how do research on the WEB. And, this issue is on the bottom of the list of issues that I am interested in writing about.
Beggars are NOT in a position to complain about anything.
Just my opinion, but I am NEVER wrong.
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Good! Your digested wax theory is worthy of no further attention.
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Doug Kanter wrote:

And, your paranoida about a NON-issue called wax on apples is worthy of no further attention on my part.
Prove to me, that the wax added to apples raises any more health issues than the pesticides apple trees naturally produce to fight off pests the natural way.
You guys are simply morons.
Just thought that you might want to know.
Ames BN, Profet M, Gold LS. Dietary pesticides (99.99% all natural). Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1990 Oct;87(19):7777-81. PMID: 2217210 http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pubmed&pubmedid "17210
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