How to ensure Trees Survive in the Planting season

Benefits of Mycorrhizal to trees and shrubs
What are Mycorrhizae?
Mycorrhiza are naturally occurring fungi which live on the roots o trees and plants which create a secondary root system that massivel extend the surface area of the root system providing water and essentia nutrients to the plant and the plant in returns gives some of the sugar it synthesises to the fungus in return.
Please see the easily explained video on how Mycorrhizae works: 'Video Symbio - Mycorrhizae in your soil von Symbio - Myspace Video (http://tinyurl.com/38qop8f )
How does Mycorrhizal fungi benefit trees?
The longer lived a plant is the greater its reliance on mycorrhiza fungi and so trees derive the greatest benefit of all.
As a seedling, the young tree roots will become infected with th mycorrhizal fungi whose fine thread like hyphae rapidly grow out int the surrounding soil effectively forming a massive secondary roo system. The fungi are able to scavenge for any available moisture in th soil as well as being adapted to mobilise scarce or hard to obtai nutrients, such as phosphorus which it passes back to the root for th tree to use. When a tree establishes this essential partnership, it wil grow at a faster rate and being healthier, will be much less susceptibl to disease whilst also increasing survival rates of newly planted tree and shrubs.
Inoculating trees with Mycorrhizae can be extremely effective. In one o the largest trials conducted the USDA Forest Service inoculated fiv million seedlings planted over 3000 acres of reclaimed mine land wit Ecto Mycorrhizae. The survival rates of the inoculated trees average 85% compared with the control trees which only average a mere 50%!
If Mycorrhizae are Natural Why Should I be Adding Them?
The fact is that the association between a tree root and its fin mycorrhizal fungal threads is a delicate one and can easily be damage or lost. Disturbed, compacted and contaminated soils will not suppor mycorrhizal fungi, and every time a tree is moved and transplanted th mycorrhizal association is lost.
The good news is that commercial inocula are available that allows th easy and economical establishment of mycorrhizae at any stage of trees life and one of just two types of inoculum is required for mos usual tree planting.
The Benefits of Mycorrhizae for Tree Planting
Mycorrhizae have now been used in commercial tree planting an landscaping for the last ten years and the commercial benefits are wel documented. These include: significantly reduced transplant losses reduced fertiliser and irrigation water requirements and faster growin and healthier trees.
Inoculating Trees Couldnt be Simpler
Mycorrhizae can be applied in at any stage of a trees life t reintroduce the symbiotic relationship and benefits between the tree and the mycorrhiza. This can be used in newly planted trees to kic start the symbiotic relationship. It can also be used to help reduc stress in older trees by reintroducing the mycorrhiza to increase th trees access to key nutrients and water
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Dan_Symbio

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You're beginning to sound like a salesman.

So if you are dealing with sterilized soil or toxic mine tailings that have never supported a biotic community, it may make sense to use mycorrhizae on perennial plants.

Dan, you seem to be cherry picking the facts. To what end? Retail?

relationship with naturally occuring (no need to purchase) mycorrhizae.

You MAY be able to hasten the relation$hip, but it is an inevitable one in any event.
You have distorted the need to inoculate with mycorrhizae beyond recognition.

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Dan_Symbio wrote:

This is getting monotonous. Make a personal contribution or piss off.
D
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On 11/25/2010 2:52 AM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

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