How Often Can I Apply Epsom Salts for Blue Spruce?

I have read on these newsgroups that one teaspoon of Epsom salt mixed in a gallon of water will help blue evergreens to be extra blue. I apply the teaspoon of Epsom salt dissolved in a gallon of water, then I water generously. It does work, they are nice and blue.
My question is how often can I apply the Epsom salts to small (young) blue spruce bushes without overdoing it?
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Tony Sivori


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On Sat, 31 Jul 2004 10:33:01 -0400, Tony Sivori

Couple times a year. Magnesium is good for most plants, just like iron is good for animals. Without small amounts, living things die.
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What does your soil test tell you about the magnesium level of your soil? Without knowing that, you shouldn't be applying epsom salts at all. Many areas of the country already have almost toxic proportions of magnesium present in the soil, and continually adding more will end up poisoning the plants and the soil.

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Sunflower wrote:

Where can I get a soil test? Does Home Depot sell them and how much are they?
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Tony Sivori


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Any kind of do it yourself test on soil other than pH is extremely unreliable. Your local county agricultural extension service provides testing for cheap or free as part of the things you purchase with your tax dollars. (Unless you are willing to pay a soil testing company about $20 to do the same thing.) Why do you think farmers have been using the extension service for years? They have to know what's in their soil in order to make a living, and it's money out of their profits if they apply too much or not enough of any of the plant's needed nutrients.. Follow the extension service's recommendations, and test several areas of your yard. 1. Completely unamended soil, like was there before you ever did a thing. 2. A well amended garden bed. 3. Your lawn. Testing these 3 at a minimum will give you an idea of what your naitive soil is composed of, as well as what your garden beds have become, and testing the lawn is a must if you actually want to grow grass successfully. The extension service can give you the recommended amendments in either chemical or organic components, or a mix of both, whatever your personal philosophy might be.
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