How do I kill gnat eggs in indoor soil, organically?

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I have some potted indoor plants and every time we water them, we see gnats flying around the house afterwards. ( even in winter )
Is there an organic way to get rid of them? Like maybe garlic powder in the water I give them? Something that will kill the eggs without harming me?
What about spraying the soil in the pots with rubbing alcohol?
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Yours In Liberty, Melissa - Colorado, U.S.A.

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snipped-for-privacy@pagan.netk says... :) Is there an organic way to get rid of them? Like maybe garlic powder in the :) water I give them? Something that will kill the eggs without harming me? :) :) There is a variety of BT that will be effective on gnat larvae, or you can repot the plant in "clean" dirt. water.
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BT?
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Yours In Liberty, Melissa - Colorado, U.S.A.


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its a bacteria..its used in those mosquito dunks..just do a google search for "BT +pesticide" its organic :)
saideth:

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Bt is not specific. Bt-k will so nothing for fungus gnats.

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snipped-for-privacy@pagan.netk says... :) > There is a variety of BT that will be effective on gnat :) > larvae, or you can repot the plant in "clean" dirt. :) > water. :) :) BT? :) :) :) Bacillus thuringiensis (BT) if a bacteria that attacks different insects...some varieties attack different flies (mosquitos, gnats) others will target caterpillars and another beetle.
http://www.ghorganics.com/BTI_For_Fungus_Gnats.htm
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Sprinkle the soil with cinnamon, the gnasty little gnats will magically disappear. Works everytime.
Val

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Hmm, would it dissolve in the plant water? If I put it in my watering can?
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You don't need to make it complicated. Just get your little can, or jar of cinnamon and sprinkle it on the soil. Done deal, real easy. You need to put that watering can away for awhile, that's one of the big reasons you have them, they are fungus gnats. Val
saideth:

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No, I use a water meter and only water when the plants get dry. This is Colorado, not much fungus around here.
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Yours In Liberty, Melissa - Colorado, U.S.A.

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saideth:

and fast Tina
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There was paper published in Nature or Science last month detailing the surprising amount of fungal activity (during winter no less) under Coloradan snow covers.
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saideth:

You asked for advice so why the argument? Water meters are notoriously ineffective and potting soil for houseplants tends to be very moisture retentive anyway. For a totally non-chemical approach, repot the plants in fresh soil, back off on the watering and place a thin layer of coarse sand (aquarium sand works well) on the top of the soil. The gnats are disinclined to lay their eggs on the sand. Fungus gnats are extremely common in houseplants and this is SOP for their control
BTW, there are fungal spores everywhere, Colorado included.
pam - gardengal
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I do not think this is a good idea, for long term. Rubbing alcohol spraying might always leave blind spots, and I do not know what could happen to your plants.
BT means Bacillus thuringiensis. Check out http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/earthkind/ekgarden25.html for more info. It basically kills worms and larvae.
I do not think cinamon powder dissolves in water -- if you have tried sprinkling them over your Capuccino. They seem to tend to float on the water.
If everything fails, I think you can try growing Pings beside your indoor plants. Pings -- also known as butterwort (Pinguicula), is a kind of carnivorous plant whose leaves act like living fly papers. I used to grow my Pings in my office, and I do not know how effective it is for gnats for homes, but I do not think it brings any negative impacts either.
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Melissa you can use the product Houseplant and Garden Spray and the best thing to do is water a bunch and spray them as the come out it works great. you can find the product here:
http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com/products.php?pid 9

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Spraying plants for fungus gnats is not effective. You will need to buy Bt-i H-14. I know that sounds all crazy and out there, but they do sell it here:
http://www.gardensalive.com/item_display.asp?ProductNumber 62&PROG_NBR=9
I know it is expensive, but it has a two year shelf life and mine has lasted even longer when stored in a dry, dark closet in the kitchen.
If you want, you can run up to the box stores and buy mosquito dunks. The come in donut shaped pieces and are sold on a card. You can buy 6 for about 8 dollars and grind them up in the blender with some water and add that to your watering can. I have no rate of application to give you, but less is always more. It may not be AS effective as the Bt-i H-14, which is specific for fungus gnat larvae.
Victoria

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snipped-for-privacy@skullblocks.com says... :) Melissa you can use the product Houseplant and Garden Spray and the best :) thing to do is water a bunch and spray them as the come out it works great. :) you can find the product here: :) :) :) The problem treating this way is you won't stop the source so it is a continual problem. You may reduce the number of adults greatly but they will return. The way to stop the problem altogether by getting to the source. And then watch the watering habits for the plant.
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cinnamon is the way to go, it really does work, than slow up on the watering.
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Sam
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Fergidaboudit Sam. If it isn't complicated, come with an MSDS sheet, is preferably expensive and hard to find she ain't gonna pay attention. Nevermind that Melissa could grab some cinnamon out of the cupboard and give a good sprinkle on the surface of the soil of her infested plants and POOF her gnats would be gone, literally in minutes. Perhaps if we had given her dance steps, incantations, costly and rare equipment to procure and complicated instructions for administering this exotic remedy she'd have gone for it............go figure.
Val
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get rid of gnats procedure (I have not tried this myself, but here you go)
what you need: fixed (non oscillating fan) standard ductwork (either 3x10 rect or round will be fine) back flow damper for duct cardboard box(es) table hungry and/or curious people several dozen apple cinammon doughnuts
1 partition an area using the cardboard boxes 2 obscure the view to the inside so that it can only be seen by peering though an opening in the cardboard boxes 3 create a wide mouthed chute directly in front of the box opening. make sure it's immovable and that an average sized person will have to bend to peer through the opening 4 connect the chute to the back flow damper and damper to a Y in the ductwork 5 connect the other side of the Y to a duct leading to the fan 6 route the end of the Y so that the duct rests on the pot of the plant with the fungus problem 7 turn the fan on and put some doughnuts on a table next to the chute 8 keep buying doughnuts until there are no more fungus gnats
You may need some manual adjustments for fan pressure or duct routing.
This will probably get rid of your fungus gnats, but you may have a cockroach problem afterwards. You may also find policemen strangely attracted to the area.
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