How do I attract/grow aphids (I am NOT kidding!)

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Coleus x hybridus is an obsolete name. The various plants formerly described as species of Coleus involved in the hybridization are all now considered to be no more than selected leaf color forms of a single species correctly named Solenostemon scutellarioides.

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What's your climate like? The leaves will be damaged by the slightest touch of frost, but the stems will hang on a little longer than extremely soft-stemmed plants like for example impatiens and begonias. However, it's been my experience that persistent nights below 45 degrees or so usually lead to root or stem rot.
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While I was down at HomeDepot, I asked several pelple from the garden department for "nasturtium." They looked at me as if I was from Mars! One of them actually pointed me to the vegetable section!!! I was wondering if it goes by some "common" name that the HD people would recognize!
PS> if anyone has a pic (or link with pic) handy, it would go a long way! Because then, I can just show them the pick and say: this is what I'm looking for! ;-)
Thanks! Sam
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Nasturtium is the common name, Tropaeolum the genus name, but everyone who has gardened for even a week knows them as nasturtiums, being commonly planted by eight year olds as one of the easiest & cheapest instant-gratification flowers one can grow carefree from seeds. What you have learned from your trip to Home Depot is their workers lack even the expertise of an eight year old.

http://www.paghat.com/nasturtium.html
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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I have rarely, if ever seen nasturtium being sold at the box stores. Occasionally I see the 'Alaska' variety being sold in hanging baskets. It is an edible flower and seed pod, when green. It is a hot, peppery flavor.
That's why they didn't know. You also probably didn't ask the nursery person, but a person who is there to water.
Victoria

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Sam, if you were asking for nasturtiums now, (late October), they might have been looking at you strangely because no store in North America would be selling nasturtium plants at this time of year. They are summer annuals - best planted by seed, but occasionally sold as seedlings in flats, available in late April - May. I would recommend looking for seeds anyway - the plants are easy to grow from the big seeds, and of course it's MUCH cheaper than buying flats.

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They do sell the seeds at Home Depot and Lowes in early winter/spring in my area. It wouldn't surprise me if nasturtiums weren't available in your area now, but then my HD doesn't even have a vegetable section this time of year. Did you actually look in the veggy section? Sometimes they put things wherever there's space. If you pronounced it NAS-TI- TURDI-YUM! I would have also looked at you funny but would have pointed you to the manure section.
At the minimum you should be able to find them the Ferry Morse white seed packets (when in season).
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Not true. I just planted my seeds for nasturtium 'Alaska' which will flower profusely all winter. They are cool weather annuals. Sometimes in the summer they go dormant and come back out about now...several of the plants I had last winter are now starting to push up shoots from the ground.
Up north, they can grow very well in late fall into winter and can tolerate a light frost.
Victoria

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Google nasturtium seeds and you should find a supplier even this time of yr!

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I think I found it online...
is this it???
http://www.sandmountainherbs.com/watercress.html
I thought watercress was a different plant??? I'm very confused now.
Sam wrote:

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Sorry to confuse you. No it's not the same. At least I don't think so. The plant that goes by the common name "nasturtium" is a "new world" plant (i.e. indigenous to the Americas, and therefore unlikely to be encountered and named by a bunch of musty old Romans). There are apparently other plants named in a genus 'nasturtium' (your link). According to paghat (hi paggers), the genus of plant we are talking about is 'Tropaeolum'. She also posted a link to a picture.
- ST
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I think the nasturtium you may be looking for can be found here: http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/CoopExt/4DMG/Flowers/Annuals/happy.htm sed5555
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nasturtium leaves taste very similar to watercress and can be used interchangebly in recipes calling for watercress (watercress sandwiches and the like). So occasionally they are called watercress-like, or flowering watercress. They are not related botanically, and they grow in different circumstances. (Nasturtiums would not enjoy having constantly wet roots for instance).

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