Horesechestnut in the wind?

Considering the above for an area that has heavy springtime winds. Any experience? Aesculus Hippocastanum. Got some seeds in Tuscany a couple of months ago. Thanks. Peter Hight
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If growing from seed, it will be *many* years before wind would be an issue. Having said that, these trees get pretty large over time-- combine that with their general poor shoing in the fall and relatively unattractive winter habit, and you get a tree best left to very large estates, golf courses, etc.
Just my opinion of course...
Dave

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
from snipped-for-privacy@svn.net (Peter Hight) contains these words:

IME, even young trees (10 ft +) lose branches to wind, then the wound becomes an ingress point for rot or disease and creates a weak spot for future wind damage.
They have such large leaves that they are vulnerable to wind and mature trees are known for dropping large branches, so not a good choice for exposed areas, especially near buildings or roads.
Nothing much will grow in their shade, either.
Janet (Scotland).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
But they produce lovely large pink or white flower-spikes in spring and alluring, albeit inedible, nuts in autimn. zemedelec
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.