home composting

will i just be able to use a normal bin and put grass cutting and that stuff and get compost out?
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Findlay Tulloch


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No, probably not. The compost should be in contact with the ground.
As for lawn clippings, the best thing to do with them is leave them on the lawn.
Saves you taking the grass to the compost pile, making compost then spreading it on the lawn.
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Dan Espen

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On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 17:56:53 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:

Not true.

Agreed.
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Travis in Shoreline Washington

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Well, can't think of a better way to get the earthworms and other creepy crawly stuff in there.
Yes I know some people use those rotating drums. Some people even put up walls and fences.
I learned from my mom and for me the compost pile will remain just that. A pile of stuff that breaks down and makes good dirt.
--
Dan Espen

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On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 20:16:26 +0000, Findlay Tulloch wrote:

What is a "normal bin"?
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Travis in Shoreline Washington

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Findlay Tulloch wrote:

Yes but it will be too small to heat up so you will be doing cold composting which is slower but works fine in the end. It will also have the disadvantage that you cannot turn it easily. Make sure it doesn't get too wet or it will go anerobic and stink. When it is full where will you put your plant waste until the process is complete? Usually people have 2 or 3 heaps or bins. I don't know why you would put grass clippings in it.
David
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But you DO need to keep it moist. To expedite the process, nurseries sell "compost starter". Anybody know what's in it?
Also, for climates or areas that don't have a lot of deciduous trees, we don't get dead leaves in the autumn. So grass clippings are necessary; maybe not tons, but at least some.
Whatever you do, refrain from using pine, etc. needles. I put in a lot from the (whatever) in front of my house, and they just sat there.
I highly recommend keeping chickens whereever you can pen them up. Years after the last one went to that great henhouse in the sky, the soil back there is still so fertile, you just put in the seed and jump back.
HB
(This is mild climate; So. Calif coastal)
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