History And Care Of Gardenia Plants And Gardenia Flowers

Hi Everybody,
I just published an article about gardenia plants and thought it might be helpful for some members in this forum....
*Gardenia* is a genus of flowering plants comprised of about 142 species belonging to the family of Rubiaceae. Gardenia plants are indigenous to the tropical and subtropical areas of Africa, Asia and Australia.
Gardenias are evergreen shrubs which can grow from two to twenty feet or more in height in their natural habitat. The leaves are glossy, dark green growing from about one to ten inches long depending on the species. Gardenia flowers are white or yellow in color and develop either a single or a cluster of blossoms. The flowers of many species are known for their intoxicating sweet scent.
[image: http://a4578bxyqrmka19x.info/resources/_wsb_250x234_Gardenia+Diamond $27s+Fragrant+Delight.jpg]
Gardenia 'Diamond's Fragrant Delight'
*Gardenia jasminoides*, also known as Gardenia grandiflora, originated in Asia. In China Gardenia jasminoides is called Zhi zi and in Japan it is called Kuchinasi. The yellow flowers are used in both countries as dye for clothes and food. It has been grown in China for more than one thousand years and has been introduced to England in the 18th century. Several hybrids have been created, including low growing plants with large flowers. The white flowers are large and highly fragrant. Several decades ago the flowers were worn by men as boutonnieres on special occasions. Jazz singer Billie Holiday called gardenia flowers her trademark by wearing them in her hair. Today the flowers are still a favorite choice for weddings and proms.
Gardenia jasminoides is considered a difficult plant to take care of. Many times gardenia plants with many buds are bought and the buyer eagerly awaits the opening of the flowers. But many times the buds drop without further development. When purchasing gardenia plants it's better to start with small plants without buds. The plants need some time to adjust to the environment in their new home. Once the plants have adjusted to their new home, flower buds start to develop into beautiful, sweetly scented gardenia flowers.
*Gardenia taitensis*, also called Tahitian Gardenia and Tiare Flower, is one of only a few plants indigenous to Polynesia. This evergreen tropical shrub can grow as tall as twelve feet. The flowers are white, composed of five to nine petals and very fragrant.
Inhabitants of Polynesia use these highly fragrant flowers as necklaces. These floral necklaces are called *Ei* on the Cook Islands, *Hei* on Tahiti and *Lei* on Hawaii.
On some Pacific islands wearing these gardenia flowers indicates one's relationship status. When the flower is worn on the right ear, the person is available. When the flower is worn on the left ear, the person is taken.
The flowers of Gardenia taitensis are used to make *Monoi Tiare Tahiti*, which is a perfume oil, by infusing the flowers in coconut oil. This process is called *Enfleurage*. The process uses odorless fats that are solid at room temperature to capture the fragrant compounds released by plants.
In addition, the flowers are also used in highly priced perfumes, like Tiare by Ormonde Jayne and Tiare by Chantecaille.
Other popular Gardenia species include *Gardenia brighamii*, *Gardenia cornuta* and *Gardenia nitida*, to name a few.
Gardenia plants prefer *partial sun* and should be protected from the hot afternoon sun during the summer months. They grow and flower well under *grow lights* where night temperatures should not go below 60 to 65 degrees which translates to 15 to 18 degrees Celsius.
[image:
http://a4578bxyqrmka19x.info/resources/_wsb_250x272_Gardenia+coronata.jpg ]
Gardenia coronata
Gardenia plants are *prone to root disease*. Growing them in *clay pots* can reduce the risk as the potting medium dries out faster in clay pots. Gardenia plants prefer an acidic potting medium, soil, meaning the soil ph is less than 7. If the potting medium is not acid enough, many nutrients, including iron, cannot be absorbed by the roots and the plants develop a condition, called *Chlorosis* which expresses itself in yellowing of the leaves. Some gardeners pour a small amount of vinegar at the top of the soil to prevent or treat mild cases of Chlorosis.
It is best to *water* the plants when the surface of the potting medium looks and feels dry. It is recommended to avoid using hard tap water. If the tap water is very hard, adding some vinegar to the watering can lowers the ph level of the water. When watering it is important to water the plants thoroughly until water drips through the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot. The gardener needs to make sure that no water remains in the saucer after the drainage process is complete.
When *fertilizing* gardenia plants any balanced fertilizer at one quarter strength of the recommended dosage can be used. Using a fertilizer designed for acid loving plants reduces the risk of Chlorosis.
*Humidity* should be kept at 50% or higher. If humidity is low, misting the plants frequently or using a humidifier greatly benefits gardenia plants.
When proven and tested guidelines are followed, gardenia plants with their highly fragrant flowers bring years of enjoyment to the outdoor and indoor gardener.
Copyright Bob Walsh
--
BobWalsh


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/15/12 3:35 PM, BobWalsh wrote:

http://a4578bxyqrmka19x.info/resources/_wsb_250x234_Gardenia+Diamond $27s+Fragrant+Delight.jpg]
Bud drop often occurs from a lack of zinc. I give my gardenia a small amount of zinc sulfate about once every 3 weeks.
Gardenias will not flower unless the weather is quite warm in the summer. With a hot summer, mine will sometimes continue flowering even in the winter despite light night-time frosts.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15/02/2012 23:35, BobWalsh wrote:
(snip - see Bob's OP for detail).
A very good summary. Only addition I would make is a mention of the "Kleim's Hardy" cultivar of Gardenia jasminoides.
It isn't frost hardy, of course, but it's a lot hardier than Gardenia jasminoides itself, and not quite as free-flowering IME.
--

Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Nice post.
I've got a potted gardenia about 40 years old that I've taken to cloning and have grown numerous plants to give to family, friends and neighbors.
Cloning from cuttings is easy when done in the hottest weather in a humid environment.
My plants are indoors most of the year and put outside in the summer. We get a lot of flowers.
Inside, I lost one plant to scale before I knew how to treat with systemic, and mist in the winter with slightly soapy water to keep down spider mites. They are really not that hard to take care of. Maybe because my well water is slightly acidic, I've never had an acid problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

[...]
[...]
***Bob, I really truly do appreciate your kindness in posting this comprehensive article on Gardenias
But something snapped within me <key melodramatic music> when I read "comprised of". This incorrect usage seems to be spreading like kudzu. It isn't just you, believe me!
One can say "comprise" with a direct object: "flowering plants COMPRISE 142 species...
or
One can say "composed of": "flowering plants COMPOSED OF" 142 species...
But one ***cannot*** say "comprised of".
There, I got it off my chest. So why don't I feel better...it's probably a losing battle. <sigh>
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Huh? omprise |k?m?pr?z| verb [ trans. ] consist of; be made up of : the country comprises twenty states. make up; constitute : this single breed comprises 50 percent of the Swiss cattle population | ( be comprised of) documents are comprised of words. - Oxford American Dictionary
Bad enough to be retentive, but wrong on top of it? Oy!
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

***I''ll cop to "elegant"
but wrong on top of it? Oy!
***Not wrong. (Some) dictionaries -- not the best ones -- adopt a new and incorrect usage because it has become current. For them, there are no standards; there is only what -- dare I say "hoi polloi" -- has begun to use, which spreads, as I suggest, like kudzu. Some of the terms that are now "acceptable" in these crowd-pleasing dictionaries, would shock even Billy.
This post, on one of the many sites that wrestle with this issue, nails it neatly: Ignorance and pretentiousness.
************************* is comprised of has found its way into popular usage for the same reason that between you and I has: people wanting (and failing) to sound intelligent. So this is between you and me: if you are trying to sound intelligent, just say that your stupid damn whole consists of your stupid dumb parts or let the whole actively comprise the parts, no matter what your stupid dictionaries or fake news anchors say. If you are not trying to sound intelligent, why even stick your neck out for comprise in the first place? Just say is made up of or is composed of or whatever. Simple logic, people: Know your place.
****************************
HB

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's tough to find a non-provocative expression for the masses in this country where everybody is, in theory, equal.
(Note to self: Go out front and check if my WE ARE THE 99% sign is still firmly dug into the lawn.)

More like despair. Sometimes if you call a thing by its name, you get hammered. Like, people still call the U.S. a "democracy", when it has demonstrably become a "plutocracy". The truth can be painful. Denial is more comfortable if you don't mind reliquishing use of the brain we were given by (a) "God" or (b) evolution;
speaking of "getting hammered": Years ago, a telling incident. I was demonstrating -- one of the two times I ever got out on the battle lines -- with a Sierra Club group on some environmental problem; can't even remember what it was. I noticed that the counter-demonstration across from us looked very different from us. They were dressed differently; they had a whole 'nothr look to them. I made a casual remark to that effect to a fellow Sierra Clubber -- and got my head handed to me! Wow!
[...]

[...]
***Ask the author.
What happened to your old .sig. Now THEM were fightin' words!
Sorry I ever blew my grammatical stack. Used to suffering in silence, but once in a while...
Now back to gardening.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Ahem. If you are the 99%, who the hell are the masses?

Beware hubris.
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'"ll' cop to "legant ''.
Oy!
***From one of the many Web sites struggling with this usage": ============
Comprise or Compose? Comprise means "is made up of" or "consists of." The whole comprises the parts.
Compose means "make up" or "make." The parts compose the whole.
Incorrect: The rock is comprised of three minerals.
Correct: The rock is composed of three minerals.
Correct: The rock comprises three minerals.
Correct: Three minerals compose the rock.
If you are confused, just say, "The rock is made up of three minerals," or "Three minerals make up the rock."
==============
People who want to sound intelligent, but are actually ignorant, say "between you and I", because in the back of their confused little minds, "you and me" sounds vaguely...not fancy enough. They also fail to distinguish between colloquial usage -- "Who's there?" "It's me" and the strictly correct " It is I" which NOBODY says.
Same with "compose" and "comprise". This tsunami of ignorance has gained strength in perhaps the last eight to ten years, and is probably unstoppable, since hoi polloi does not read, and is often taught in school by teachers who are lamentably ignorant of grammar and syntax.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/18/12 12:59 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

You and I are have very similar views on this subject. See my <http://www.rossde.com/malaprops/index.html .
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

***Wow, you really went to a lot of trouble & covered a lot of ground.
So far, my hair shirts are stored in a drawer called "Language Horrors".
One category is "Words often confused and misused: Some examples:
WHO-WHOM LAY-LIE COMPOST-COMPRISE HOME-HONE MAY-MIGHT RETICENT-RELUCTANT PEDAL-PEDDLE REIGN-REIN PROSTRATE-PROSTATE SUSPECT-SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT-INCIDENCE
(contributions invited)
Actually, WHO-WHOM is a 9th circle of Hell all unto itself. More a syntax problem than a simple confusion. Sigh So few understand the difference between the subject of a dependent clause and the object of a preposition. And if hoi polloi did, they probably wouldn't care.
Then there are larger categories, like
DECLINE OF THE PERFECT TENSE
IN TERMS OF (this is one of my pet hates. People can't think ahead to frame a sentence; they back in; can't get out fall back on "In terms of". Can't resist an example, Congresscritters are particularly egregious violators in this regard.
In terms of the contraception debate, there were only men on a panel about this subject. Translation: There were only men on a panel about contraception.
I could go on. But I was shoveling compost, so must get back to that more rewarding task.
HB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Oy! Would you stop shooting yourself in the foot? I understand you, obscure heteronym, or not.

Since experts disagree, and communication was established, I'd say, "relax".
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.