Herbs: the finishing touch for your human habitat

Donít forget herbs when planting that special garden that will become your own unique human habitat. Plant a variety of herbs around the perennial shrubs and youíll enjoy a fragrant haven that both soothes and stimulates the senses.
Here are a few herbs that will work great in your human habitat.
Sage There are several varieties of sage but I think one of the neatest is Sage Bergartten that originated in the Bergartten Botanic Garden in Germany. This variety rarely blooms but instead produces an abundance of leaves that can be enjoyed as is or clipped off to use in marinades and stuffing. Grown in full sun, it will reach a mature height of around two feet.
If youíre looking for something a bit more showy, thereís a variety called Sage Pineapple salvia elegans. It has a delightful pineapple scent and produces tubular red flowers that are quite stunning Ė and edible. Iíve heard from people who tell me they make tea from its bright green leaves and those red flowers will attract hummingbirds and butterflies to your human habitat. Cheryl and I use the flowers as garnishes or an unusual addition to salads and fresh fruit dishes.
Chives Allium shoenoprasum, commonly known as chives, are the most delicate member of the onion family. The bright green foliage has a grass-like quality that can bring out the colors of other perennials around which it is planted.
Chives grow quite quickly in full sun to a height of 10 or 12 inches and produce purplish-pink flowers that can be added to salads along with the tangy, tasty leaves.
Oregano I love the fragrance of oregano so much that I planted some near a garden bench so I can enjoy its fresh perfume in the morning as I collect my thoughts for the day. The masses of bright green leaves are delightful to look at, and if the sight and smell of oregano wasnít enough, it tastes great too. Add the peppery leaves to Italian, Mexican and Spanish dishes straight from your garden and youíll never want the supermarket variety again!
Oregano is a versatile perennial herb that can grow in full sun, partial sun or shade. Plant in a well drained location and keep it watered. You can start snipping sprigs when it is about six inches tall. An unsnipped plant will reach a mature height of about 24 inches.
Corsican mint Also known as mentha requienii, Corsican mint produces masses of tiny aromatic leaves that are used to flavor crŤme de menthe liqueur. It spreads quite quickly and forms a fragrant mat around other plants and can be used as a groundcover too. Itís the ideal herb to plant between the rustic paving stones in your human habitat. The little leaves can withstand light foot traffic and release that wonderful mint aroma when stepped on.
Corsican mint performs best in moist, fertile soil in full sun. It can be divided in spring or autumn. If you are concerned about it spreading, you can also plant it in a container but youíll miss the fun of wiggling your bare toes in it on a summer morning.
Creeping Rosemary Rosemary officinalis prostratus, or creeping rosemary, is a fragrant, perennial, evergreen shrub with the added benefit of being edible. It is a good choice for a rock garden or atop a dry wall and makes a very aromatic ground cover, spilling over pathways and trailing up to four or five feet.
Creeping rosemary is easy to grow in almost any sunny, well-drained location and is hardy to 5 degrees Fahrenheit. It produces pale blue flowers from early to mid summer.
Thyme, lemon upright Lemon upright thyme (Thymus x citriodorus) would be a delightful herb to include in your human habitat. It has a bushy, upright growing habit and small, dark green leaves that give off a remarkably strong lemony scent.
It prefers full sun and light, well-drained soil, but can tolerate partial shade. It can also withstand light foot traffic and can be used as a fragrant groundcover. We love to snip off some sprigs and add them to fish and chicken dishes.
If you missed the two previous columns on creating your own human habitat, you can find them at my Web site, www.landsteward.org <http:// www.landsteward.org/>
The Plant Man is here to help. Send your questions about trees, shrubs and landscaping to snipped-for-privacy@landsteward.org
information, or to subscribe to Steveís free e-mailed newsletter, visit www.landsteward.org <http://www.landsteward.org/
Add pictures here
‚úĖ
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Does this guy ever respond to poster's questions or is it always self-promotion by pandering to our narcissistic side? For a steward of the land, he seems to know squat about ecology.
But then, he is just the shill for Greenwood Nursery, trying to get our money.
--

Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being is
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
‚úĖ
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.