herb garden

My husband's veggie garden has done so well this year that I plan to encourage him to keep it going every year. This leaves me with a small square near the patio where I used to grow a few tomatoes. I think I would like to try to grow some herbs there. What advice do you have? I would like perennials or self seeders that love sun and are easy to care for. Which ones to plant and when?
Thanks
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Hi Sandie, Most herbs are perennials and like the sun. Choose what you like to use in your cooking etc, and plant them. Basil, oregano, rosemary and thyme(jeezeI sound like Simon and Garfunkle) come to mind. Don't plant mints. They are almost impossible to get rid of and take over the bed. The roots can grow two feet down and spread all over the place. Best to use a container for them.
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Jayel
"Sandie Hudson" < snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com> wrote in message
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Hi,
Basil and parsley are not perennials here in Canada. My thyme did not survive the winter.
Franoise.
"J. Lane" wrote:

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HI Francoise, I'm a Canuck too but I've had no problem growing herbs. Possible my B.C. zone is higher than yours. Winters are not too harsh although summer's proving to be just plain nasty to plants and humans here. 37degrees celcius, uggh! and dry as a bone.
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Jayel
"Franoise" < snipped-for-privacy@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
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Francoise, Glad to hear you've visited Beautiful B.C. I live in the interior where the weather is more extreme. -20 in the worst part of winter and today was 39 degrees. Still is about 28 and it's 10pm! Back to the herbs... have you tried growing them in pots that can be brought inside in the winter? Wish I could visit you end of the country sometime. The only time I was there was when I emmigrated from England. All I got to see was the airport!
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Jayel
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Rosemary either, and your north of me. Colleen Zone 5 Connecticut.
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Plant some French Tarragon (not the Russian variety which has absolutely no flavor). French Tarragon is a perennial and can only be propogated from root stock whereas the Russian is grown from seed. Go to a reliable nusery as they often sell the russian kind without knowing how useless it is. You can always tell the difference: rub a leaf between your fingers and the FT will give off a strong anise-like scent. Graham
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I suppose you are in North Carolina. I strongly encourage you to grow a couple square yards of herbs, a pinch of them can enlighten a whole dinner. Some herbs are quite invasive and will suffocate lesser herbs. The list below are herbs I have, and I list them most important first (based on versatility, length of season, and productivity). All herbs listed below are perennial in your area. Oregano, sorrel and mint tolerate some shade, not so the rest.
1) oregano. Will eventually ground cover a large area. best tomato herb, which will give you early and late in the season.
1) Thyme. Also a groundcovering herb, excellent salad herb, remains viable well past the first fall frost.
1) Sage. Get a hardy variety. Excellent with all types of meats, and makes good tea (I mix the dried leaves with dried blackberry leaves).
4) Mint. Extremely invasive, it is the base for most of my teas (alone, with lemon balm, or linden). I grow a couple square yards of it, and four different varieties. The two best varieties end up in meat marinades or pesto for potatoes.
5) Sorrel. Extremely early and late, very productive, and great for soups and omelettes (sorrel potato soup lifts the spirits in spring and late fall). Otherwise I don't think it is that great.
6) lemon balm. Very productive, makes a very nice tea.
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I think what is most important is what do YOU use. I think you will not only enjoy it but take better care if you go out to the box regularly for cooking amendments. Full sun is the key to many and you can always use one plant to provide shade for another. Moisture can be controlled, so look through your herbs and list what you use.
I did all the herbs I use... Parsley, thyme, sage, basil, dill & oregano(in a separate bowl, invasive). I tried rosemary & cumin but they didn't germinate. I will definitely try the cumin again. Rosemary was more a try to see if I would like fresh rosemary better. I've grown cayennes for spice too.
Someone mentioned sesame...which I would like.
I also have a windowbox which I will keep near the kitchen door for winter. (could even move indoors) I've got thyme, parsley, dill, sage, and a bell pepper in it. Rosemary and cumin were supposed to be in there too. I'm not sure what will survive the winter, but I get to enjoy the easy cuttings.
DiGiTAL ViNYL (no email) Zone 6b/7, Westchester Co, NY, 1 mile off L.I.Sound 1st Year Gardener
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Sandie, I have an herb and vegetable garden here in Raleigh. I would concur with most of the advice already posted. I'd also recommend Italian flat-leaf parsley. It's a self-seeding biennial and thrives for me (whereas my sage and thyme always eventually succumb to rot due to the heavy clay soil). Plus, I can't imagine cooking without fresh parsley.
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Hi,
For what do you use Fewerfew? I have Fewerfew with my flowers. I like the small white flowers, which goes with any other type of flowers. I never thought that I could use it in dishes. Unless, we are not taking about the some thing.
Franoise.
J Kolenovsky wrote:

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