Help With Rosemary

I have trouble trying to keep rosemary alive. I know it's a tender perennial, but last year I tried putting it in a pot and bringing it inside, and it still didn't make it. I live in zone 6 and generally keep the pot in an east window.
Any tips for keeping rosemary in a pot? How often does it need to be watered? What kind of lighting do they like?
Thanks! Jennifer
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On 7 May 2004 06:42:19 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (styxx374) wrote:

I started 7 rosemary cuttings in 2003 spring. Two of these "made it," and now they are about 1.5 feet tall. When established, they prefer full sun (at least 6 hours per day) and fairly dry and hot conditions. I found it easier to plant them outdoors (I'm in zone 7) than in a pot Feed sparingly with well-diluted fish emulsion, and only when actively growing. I have two rosemary plants that I'm keeping trimmed to grow like small Christmas trees. In a pot, make sure they drain quickly and do not let the pot rest in water for more than an hour. You might be "too caring" of a person.
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Maybe you should try a hardier variety of rosemary. I'm also in zone 6 and have several friends around here that have rosemary outside.

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Please tell me what varities they have! Though I'm in Z5, I have a great microclimate in one area that might work.
Cheryl
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I'm not positive what varieties they have, because they didn't save the tags. Doing a google search only came up with one variety that is hardy to zone 6: Madalene Hill Rosemary. Here's a couple links, the second one has general care information also:
http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/rosoffmadelinehill.htm
http://www.nationalgardening.com/articles/scripts/articles.taf?id 42&ch=foodguide&food=perennial
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I believe "Arp" is hardy to Z6, and Salem MIGHT be. I grow both in Z7, outdoors, in the ground, and in completely unprotected spots and have had them for years. Cyndi
tmtresh wrote:

http://www.nationalgardening.com/articles/scripts/articles.taf?id 42&ch=foodguide&food=perennial
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snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (styxx374) wrote in message

as much sunlight as possible (southern window best), large pot (it has a taproot), water no more than once every six weeks in the winter. Once every 8 weeks is probably optimal.
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Thanks, I'll give it a try!

as much sunlight as possible (southern window best), large pot (it has a taproot), water no more than once every six weeks in the winter. Once every 8 weeks is probably optimal.
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snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (styxx374) expounded:

This is a repost of an article a friend of mine in the Herb Society wrote about rosemary:
Many people have asked how to overwinter Rosemary. A friend of mine, a fellow member of the New England Unit of the Herb Society of America, put this in our recent newsletter, the Pennyroyal Papers. I hope it helps someone :o)
Success with Rosemary by Deb Peterson
1. Rosemary can stay outside until the temps stay below 45. It can withstand some frost (Don't let the pot freeze in the ground, though, so you can't dig it out).
2. Bring it into the coolest part of the house. Rosemary is happy with night time temperatures in the fifties or even the forties.
3. Give it as much light as possible.
4. A DRY ROSEMARY IS A DEAD ROSEMARY (not shouting, but emphasis). Don't let it dry out, but don't keep it too wet. Texas potting is the secret to this dilemma. (It is remarkable drought tolerant in the summer out in the garden) Texas potting is explained below.
5. If your rosemary should develop powdery mildew, spray lightly with a mixture of one tablespoon alcohol to a cup of water. Give it a chill outside on a warm winter day. Powdery mildew is due to a lack of air circulation. ****************************************************************************
Texas Potting:
You will need:
1. Steak or roast carving fork (2 prongs) 2. A bag of perlite. 3. Appropriate sized plastic pots. 4. A source for flame
Heat the steak fork and make a double row of holes around the bottom of the pot.
Make another row of holes just below the watering lip.
Put the perlite in the bottom of the pot to just cover the double holes around the bottom.
Pot up your plant with regular potting soil. Water well.
Put the potted plants in a water tight container and fill the container to any height to just above the bottom row of holes (this is a great way to leave plants when you travel).
The secret of this system is the upper row of holes. These holes supply air to the roots. Clay pots are porous and can be used without making air holes. If you use clay, put at least 2" of perlite in the bottom. This system also works well with cyclamens.
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
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