Help! Sick tree!

Something has definitely gotten to my maple! This tree is full grown and this year the leaves are COVERED in black spots. Anyone know what this is? I don't want to lose this tree. I've posted pictures on alt.binaries.pictures.gardens. If someone could take a look an tell me what this is/how to treat it, I'll....I'll smooch ya! :) Thanks in advance!
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Just from looking at the pictures you posted, I'd say that your maple is an Acer saccharum - Sugar Maple. (Also known as a Rock Maple or Hard Maple) The black spots are most likely Leaf Scorch (a physiological disorder) and is caused by excessive drought. There isn't to much you can do about the leaves that is already affected. As for the smooch? Well I thought it was a good idea, but my wife says I have to pass. ***GRIN*** (Diagnosis made from: Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, 5th printing; Michael A. Dirr, page 54)

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As was pointed out, my above post is wrong. I was told that it is called Tar Spots. Okay, I'm good at admitting when I am wrong, and it looks like this is one of those times. I apologize for the mis-diagnosis. I went to http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC2005.htm and looked at the pics there for comparison and I was wrong. It is tar spot. It says on their webpage: "Tar spot is caused by the fungus Rhytisma acerinum. Spots arise in late spring or early summer after leaves attain full size. At first the infected tissue is light green or yellow. Then, during late summer, raised, shining black, tarlike dots develop within the yellow spots on the upper leaf surfaces. The lower surface of a leaf beneath a large tar spot turns brown, but the surface beneath speckled tar spots remains yellow. Leaves with multiple spots may wither and drop prematurely, but seldom so early or in such quantities as to threaten the health of the tree. This disease is more common in the forest, but may be seen in some landscape situations. Tar spots are among the most showy and least damaging foliar diseases. Prevention and Treatment: The fungus survives the winter in fallen leaves. Rake up and discard the leaves in fall. For chemical control use the fungicides recommended for control of anthracnose." Once again I am sorry for the mis-diagnosis. --Scott

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Looks like tar spot on a silver maple tree. The disease is cosmetic. No big deal usually.
--
Mike LaMana, MS
Heartwood Consulting Services, LLC
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