Help please

Hi I have a corner of my garden that I want to change to low maintenance I would appreciate any ideas that could help me Thank you
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Brandyball


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Brandyball wrote:

There are no instant general answers to such a question.
Where are you and what is your climate? In what way is the present planting high maintenance? What is its aspect? Does the wind often blow strongly, if so from which direction? What do you want to do with the space? What style is the rest of the garden?
Also keep in mind that 'low maintenance' is a relative term. If you want something that requires no watering, prunning, weeding or mulching then plant concrete.
David
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On Friday, February 7, 2014 1:35:17 PM UTC-8, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Or mulch. In my area (So. Calif coastal), water is very expensive, so the City encourages xeriscaping. It even offers rebates for type conversion.
Over the years, as I walk around the neighborhood, I see more people covering the ground with a thick layer of wood mulch -- the larger pieces -- with just a few well-placed succulents, cacti, and grasses.
This can look quite nice, if properly designed, and requires little or no maintenance. Plus, of course, little water.
Poster's objective may not be directly related to water usage, but succulents and cacti are definitely low maintenance. There are hundreds, if not thousands of varieties to choose from.
HB
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Higgs Boson;998362 Wrote: > On Friday, February 7, 2014 1:35:17 PM UTC-8, David Hare-Scott wrote:-

> you-

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> planting

> strongly,

> What

> want

>

> the City encourages xeriscaping. It even offers rebates for type > conversion.

> covering the ground with a thick layer of wood mulch -- the larger > pieces -- with just a few well-placed succulents, cacti, and grasses.

> no

> succulents and cacti are definitely low maintenance. There are > hundreds, if not thousands of varieties to choose from.

Thanks very much for both replies I'm in Donegal Ireland and it gives me other options to think about
Brandyball
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Brandyball


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Brandyball wrote:

Ireland is not a place I would want to try out xeriscaping, rather you may need bog tolerant plants. The enourmous difference is conditions between California and the Emerald Isle is a good example of the need to design for the location.
D
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'David Hare-Scott[_2_ Wrote:

Thanks again for all the ideas I think Patio is a good option weather here is not mild :)
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Brandyball

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Brandyball wrote:

I thought you'd like my patio suggestion. And you can set potted plants on a patio. I'd use flagstone rather than concrete, this way if you change your mind flagstone is easy to move and can be used for something else, like a retaining wall... just don't cheap out and use gravel, it will migrate, make a mess, and create maintenence. You can also use that far corner for composting, and/or a vegetable garden.
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Brooklyn1;998420 Wrote: > Brandyball wrote:-

Thanks for all the input I really appreciate it :)
Brandyball
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Brandyball;998443 Wrote: > Thanks for all the input I really appreciate it :)

I would agree with the patio option, although decking would work well too if you've considered that :)
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natty85


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Brandyball wrote:

Patio.
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On 2/7/2014 7:44 AM, Brandyball wrote:

rose of sharon (may have trouble with it spreading) and some of the herbs. If you have rainfall to get it established, perhaps oak leaf hydrangea. And a variety of bulbs. I have a low sun location and these work for me with little care.
I like the patio idea. Less is more.
Jeff
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