Help Identifying Fungus

Hi All,
I have a strange circle in my garden where the grass does not grow very well and a couple of times a year, brown fungus / mushrooms appear. Any help in identifying what it is / the cause and how to get rid of it would be much appreciated. Not sure if it matters, but we're based in North Wales UK.
I've attached a couple of photos.
Thanks in advance.
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Hedgecop


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On 2015-09-13 16:41:35 +0000, Hedgecop said:

Appears to be Bostonius terriensis. It is a beneficial organism.
All kidding aside - it is not possible to identify the fungus as to species from the pictures, basically you have LBMs growing on your lawn (Little Brown Mushrooms).
The following may be informative ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairy_ring
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On 9/13/2015 9:41 AM, Hedgecop wrote:

I am unable to view your images.
Is the circle solid or a ring? Is it expanding?
If the circle is a ring, is the lawn more green inside the ring than outside the ring? If so, then Amos Nomore is correct; you have fairy ring.
While it might be unsightly for a while, fairy ring is not really a serious problem. The fungus is consuming dead matter in the soil, converting it into a nitrogenous waste. The waste is actually a nutrient for your lawn. the only problem is that the mushrooms are likely toxic.
If you really want to be rid of the fungus, buy a small bag of soil sulfur and lightly sprinkle it along and just outside the circle. Be sure to lightly rinse the sulfur into the lawn, down to the soil surface. Otherwise, it might burn the grass leaves. Soil bacteria will very slowly convert the sulfur into sulfuric acid, which will acidify your soil and kill the fungus. DO NOT DO THIS if your soil is already quite acidic.
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David E. Ross
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Yellow patches on your lawn and a dog in the picture?
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Dan Espen

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I wasn't able to view your pictures.
Many years ago there were numerous round, brown spots in my yard. After trying fertilizer and other suggested chemicals, that didn't work, along with trying to dig out the spots and replace with new soil. I mixed up a bucket of caustic soda and water, and poured on each spot. Within two weeks the grass had grown thick and completely filled in the spots. I don't know if it will work for you. I'm in west Texas. It might be worth a try.
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On 9/15/2015 10:12 PM, Dusty wrote:

Where I live, the soil tends to be quite alkaline. Caustic soda would make the soil to be even more alkaline, enough to kill any plants growing in it.
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That might at least get rid of the fungus, so something else can grow.
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If I saw that in my yard I would assume Marasmius oreades.
But you're in the UK, and different locales may have different species.
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