Help for Wilted Tomato Plants :(

My tomato plants had just started to flower, (Sungold and Early Girl) and then BOOM! Now they've wilted with a strange twisted shape. (See photos at http://www.inhouzemusic.com/z ) I suspect some kind of bacterial wilt. We had some rain the other day, and I understand water splashing on soil and onto the leaves can carry the disease. I'm not sure where the disease came from, as we had strawberries in this bed for the past few years.
Sooo, my question is, where do I go from here? Are these plants definitely gonners? Luckily, I have several backup plants still in containers that look beautiful. Can I yank out the infected plants and plant these in their place? The only other place I have for them is in the same bed, the other half of a 4'x8' raised bed where I just harvested the garlic. Is there some way to eliminate the disease or reduce the plant's chances of getting infected again?
Thanks.
-Fleemo in Zone 9
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Offhand, looks more like a virus or herbicide drift. Take a look here: http://home.earthlink.net/~shelly.johnson/tomato.html
And toss down some mulch... things tend to be happier when mulched.
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Oh my gosh, I did just put down some "Weed & Feed" fertilizer on my lawn, which borders the vegetable beds. I wonder if some drifted onto the tomatoes??? If that was the case, ya think they're gonners?
I guess my real question here is whether it'd be inadviseable to plant more tomatoes in this same spot, adding mulch and being careful to only water from beneath?
-F
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Can't tell. My guess is they'll be mildly to maybe severely set back. If the herbicide was applied a week ago, and you're only seeing this much, you'd probably get some fruit yield.

Given that you may have flung some weed and feed in the area, I'd probably forgo replanting there this year unless you know what the chemical was, and what the half life in the soil is (try checking Extoxnet).
I'm still wondering about viruses though, as it looks like you've got healthy plants nearby, and I'd expect them to show some signs of stress if it were something like 2,4-D.
2,4-D is rather volatile at high temps, btw... used to see a lot of damaged grapes and poppies in the midwest when the farmers had herbicided cornfields and then we had a hot day and a prevailing wind.
Safest thing to do is probably put some of your emergency reserve plants in pots with uncontaminated soil.
Some photos for you: http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/dp_hfrr/extensn/POW/2001/July_4.htm
Kay
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On 1 Jun 2004 10:57:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Fleemo) wrote:

Not positive but think that berries my be susceptible to some of the same "wilts" that tomatoes get. I know that raspberries and tomatoes aren't supposed to be grown together or one after the other.
But... did you spray any broadleaf weed killer ..or .. a neighbor spray dandelions/other broad leaf weeds in their yard lately? 2 4 D contamination can cause contorted growth.
Could also be fusarium, verticillum wilt. You have a county extension agent office in town? Master Gardener program usually mans the phones for gardening questions. Might be able to take an example, or direct them to that url if they have computer access in their office.
If not, check to see if there is a garden center that has folks working that aren't just hires off the street, but has knowledgable folks. That would be my second choice. Cutting off a branch and hauling it in would be hard to tell whether the wilting when you got there with it was from a disease or the being cut and hauled in. Put it in a bucket with some water in the bottom immediately..as in take it with you to the plant and cut.. into the bucket with it.. if it comes to that.
If you end up finding out that it's one of the wilts.. I was told that it's going to be there, in the ground from then on, but you can buy resistant varieties, and of course, don't plant things that are affected one after the other.. rotate the crops.
I have anthracnose in my yard for sure, and the neighbor's tree died from one of the wilts, but they didn't know which, so I imagine it's all through the place.
I hope it's a careless neighbor rather than the other. Either way, do not put the plants in the compost bin.
Janice

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