Harding off advice

I generally start plants with bottom heat in trays for a few days. After emerging I take off the plastic top and place out in a bright spot for a few days bring in at night. Than I move the culled survivors to a cold where they reside until the night is above 50 F. Then outside still in their trays for a few days, Then into the garden.
Any improvements would you suggest?
Found below link but it is chemical in path forward.
Bill who stores old milk bottles in cold from to moderate temperature. Heat sink in a way.
<http://home.insightbb.com/~g.mager/Growlab/Gen-seed-start.html
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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In article

Cold Frame!
Sorry!
Bill
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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I have found that doing one transplanting before going to ground gives healthier plants. I always transplant to three or four inch pots, I'm using peat pots because I have a bunch, bought on sale a couple years ago. I then pack the pots into trays. I also save and scavenge pots from friends, my own, etc. This takes more room. I use palstic dish pans and plastic cat litter trays (cheap ones) that I drill full of holes for drainage.
Transplanting seedlings when they get their first true leaves gives them a big boost for some reason and the larger pots allow for better root development.
I haul mine in and out in garden wagons, where they stay until going to ground. If it is too nasty out, I lay grow lights across the wagon in garage. I have lost plants to wind. Wind is not good on them when introducing them to the outside world.

I have wondered about painting jugs black. Been thinking about cold frame/mini greenhouse thing to extend fall harvest of greens and such into winter, using black jugs of water as heat sink.

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Multiple transplanting is unheard of here. We start in 2 inch square pots and move to earth when ready. Don't ask! :))). I'm in starting mode so will give it a try. Fun to learn new stuff!
Bill
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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Sigh.......you know I must ask. I 'spose the answer is "Because that is the way we have always done it." ;-)
Charlie
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Yup. But remember we were able to get much smaller pulled plants . I'd ask for a dozen tomatoes and get thirty. This with sweets, squash and tomatoes in particular and even flowers. Old retired navy guy had an German wife . Hell we could get orchids and eggs too. Gone now almost 20 trips about the sun.
Bill felling like an old dog.
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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Ahhh....yet you are continually learning new tricks, unlike the proverbial old dog, eh?
Thanks for starting this journey down memory lane, remembering the old ones in my life, who are no longer with me physically.
Makes me think it may be time to start wearing Big Smith Overalls and blue cotton work shirts, the oldtime oldfart uniform in older days round here. :-)
Charlie -- winamp -- Marc Antoine -- "Urban Gypsy"
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