"Hardening off" potato eyes

I had always been taught that it's good to "harden off" potato eyes before planting. Does anyone have comments about whether this is true/ false and (b) how long harden off before planting?
Next: Is there any harm in eating the rest of the potato after removing the eye and accompanying meat? I have done so & survived, but wonder if there is a problem.
TIA
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Higgs Boson wrote:

We never hardened off, but as I recall, we dabbed the cut sides with sulfur.
What rest? We always cut the potato in chunks with at least one eye and all the "meat" still attached. Doesn't the plant use the "meat" for nutrition and moisture until the green sprouts appear above ground?
gloria p
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We're on the same page. I also leave a lot of "meat" for the reason you state, but there's still a lot of potato left -- to eat or not to eat. As I say, I have survived...<g>
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Higgs Boson wrote:

I am not sure what you mean by "harden off". In cases where you cut the tater up it is usual to allow the cut surface to callus over for a day or two before planting. I understand that this is to try to prevent fungi from invading the cut area when it is buried.

There is no reason that you shouldn't eat the rest PROVIDED it meets the usual criteria of edible potatoes - that it doesn't have green areas which are likely to contain the poison solanine. As seed potatoes are often old and have been exposed to light it is common for them to fail this requirement. OTOH it is usual to not cut the eye out but cut larger tubers into segments where each segment has an eye, or to plant small tubers whole. The starch with the eye is required to provide energy to send up the new shoots, so usually there wouldn't be any spare meat to eat.
David
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That's what I meant by "harden off", not knowing any other term. But did not know the reason for doing so. I notice Gloria suggested using sulfur. May try an experiement planting some w/sulfur, some w/o.

See reply to Gloria. I do leave lots of "meat"/starch to get the new potatoes going. And I am aware of green potato danger,but didn't know the term you cite. I have never used purchased seed potatoes. Thanks for help.
HB

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Higgs Boson wrote:

It may be a marketing ploy but I've always heard that grocery store potatoes are treated to delay or prevent sprouting. therefore it was a good idea to buy untreated seed potatoes for planting since you want the "eyes" to sprout vigorously.
As I said, it may be just an old wives' tale or a marketing thing. Of course if you are planting your own potatoes from the previous crop, no problem.
gloria p
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Hmmm...well, if they ARE "treated" it isn't working! If I don't use store tomatoes soonish, they sprout like gangbusters. I suppose one solution, IF one buys into the "treatment" story, is to buy organic potatoes and eat them fast.
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Hmmm, you get tomatoes to sprout?
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On Oct 14, 6:13pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

No, I wasn't drunk...just sloppy...<g>
HB
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The reason why seed potatoes should be bought is because those bought for cooking may have viruses.
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