Growing Strawberry's

I live in Southern Kentucky. I am wanting to grow soem strawberry's at home but because of my time demands want to do so if possible without alot of upkeep.
Thought baout building a "container" for lack of a better term out of railroad ties. Kind of a pyramid, one square on top of another square, etc.
Putting down plastic for weed control then on top of the plastic putting mulch.
I have never grown strawberrys. Are they vines that put out "runners"? If so, will my idea not work because of the plastic? (Runners will not be able to root)?
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Here's a link: http://www.garden.org/search?keyword=strawberries&q=search&submit.x=0&submit.y=0&submit=search
Strawberries send out runners above the ground. At the end of each runner is a little plantlet which will take root under the right conditions. With the ones I've grown, the runners have been maybe 8-10" long, so that means you want 16-20" around each original plant. The mother plants tend to get weak & ratty after a couple of years, so you want to pay attention to the runners. Some may hang over the edge of the planter and die. I sort of helped mine by weighing them down on the soil with large bark chips.
They're a bit labor intensive, but so what? The difference between fresh strawberries and store bought ones is analogous to either having sex, or listening to a love scene from the lobby of a movie theatre, but not getting to the door of the theatre quickly enough to see it. :-)
By the way, one advantage of your pyramid idea is that when you're designing it in your head, you can include a way of making a tent using plastic mesh available at garden stores. Without that, you may end up sharing most of your crop with birds and other rascals.

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Doug Kanter Wrote:

Please don't use railroad ties, especially for anything you plan t eat. I wouldn't use any treated wood for food. From this site: http://tinyurl.com/663yt "Avoid using creosote-treated railroad ties. Freshly treated creosot lumber can leach into the soil for several years and continues to giv off vapors over a seven to nine year period."
More pressure treated wood info. http://tinyurl.com/59u5s http://tinyurl.com/728uu
New
-- Newt
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It's the strangest thing - I built a cold frame 10 years ago using UNtreated 2x10 lumber. It's been out in rain & snow every year but 2. No rotting, even the 2" or so of wood that's in constant contact with the soil. And, I didn't use rot-resistant wood like cedar or redwood - just whatever your average 2x10 at the lumber yard is made of. If it rots, so what? The frame's bolted together in such a way that in an hour, I can disassemble the sides, lay them on top of the new wood, trace the pattern & drilling points, and have a whole new frame in 2 hours, or 3 hours if the neighbors stop by to chat. 4 if they bring beer.
I just don't see a reason for treated lumber to enter one's mind, at least not for structures which are above ground. The OP's strawberry planter fits this category.
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