groundhog problems

There is a HUGE groundhog living under my shed. I see it in the back yard once in a while, eating my morning glories. Today I went out to check on the kale I planted in a raised bed, and I found that every single plant had all the leaves eaten off! (about 4 inches up) I had really been looking forward to having kale salads this fall - hopefully the plants will recover, but I'm not so sure.
Anyway, is there any way to ensure that this groundhog won't do it again? I live in the city, where unfortunately, I'm not allowed to simply shoot the darn thing.
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Hav-a-Hart makes a spendy live trap that is a little bigger than a paper half a gallon milk carton. You can catch it and relocate it. I suggest that you wire the trap so it will not function, and put food in it for a few times. Then when the animal thinks it is a source of food, you remove the wire, and the door drops down. What you do with the animal depends on your conscience. They can, do, and have returned from great distances to their home territory.
Poison is not an option, because he may crawl under somewhere and die, and stink to high heaven for a month.
Traps that kill them are an option, but that's up to you.
The trespassing offenders I get are given a 5/5 water treatment. Five minutes under water in a five gallon bucket. Then they're hawk food.
BE AWARE THAT SOME SPECIES ARE PROTECTED, SO BE VERY PRIVATE ABOUT THE DISPOSAL. DO NOT PUT IT IN YOUR TRASH, AS THE GARBAGE MEN MAY SEE IT AND REPORT YOU.
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

mine it was the 2nd largest which will take a groundhog but is too small for the large raccoons that often torment me.
Local laws are funny. I've relocated animals, even once in front of a county cop, but on the books you are not allowed to relocate but you can trap and kill them.
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Frank wrote:

You may not have to buy one. Various local organizations (Animal Rescue League, Animal Control, Dept. of wildlife conservation, etc. may be set up to lend you one for the duration. Call around.
gloria p
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The trap idea only works once for a smart animal. I had a raccoon who would reach *under* the trap and pull the bait apart and then eat the scratchings. Nothing would get him to go in the *door* of the trap, since he had been there and done that and got the shirt and once was enough thank you very much.
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Groundhogs love sheds. A plain fence did not work for me--groundhogs can climb fences. The Hav-A-Hart did not work either, groundhogs and muskrats are leary of traps. A beating one over the head did not work. I electrified the fence, problem solved. Fasten sturdy chicken wire or hardware cloth around the shed base.
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It's extremely rare for groundhogs to take up residence in cities. And a large hedgehog is not going to easily subsist foraging your meager greenery, they typically make their homes where meadows meet forests, where there's lots of easily accessible vegetation. What do you have stored in your shed? If there is anything edible like animal feed (ie; dog, cat, hamster, bird food) or near where you keep your trash cans then that would explain a hedgehog hanging around your shed. In cities especially the easiest way to dispel unwanted critters is to remove their food supply... the only reason that hedgehog is living in or around your shed is because you are feeding it, albiet inadvertantly. You are responsible for attracting/luring that hedgehog so you need to carefully relocate it to suitable habitat... if you do anything to harm that critter then I pray the very same happens to you and your loved ones.
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wrote:

I think that depends on the city. NYC, Boston probably. I live a few miles from downtown Nashville and I had a groundhog show up every year for the peaches in my yard until a dog showed up in my yard and I kept him. Gone was the groundhog, possums, rabbits and cats, although he never killed one (I love that about my dog.) I love my dog, but miss sharing the yard with some of the wildlife. Still lots of squirrels and birds though.
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On Wed, 30 Sep 2009 20:46:09 GMT, against all advice, something

You know, sometimes you can be ok. And then other times, you can be a complete and utter prick.
What's up with that?
--

Howdya like that... we started playing guitar to impress the chicks and wind
up talkin' fingernails with old men.
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Yep, that describes our place. The back of our property is up against an edge habitat of trees, where the ground goes up for about 15 feet at perhaps a 45 degree angle. Behind the trees is perhaps a 10 acre open grassy area - part of a local park. However, this groundhog took up residence under my shed, just like the several at my parents' place did under their old barn.
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"OhioGuy" wrote:

elsewhere... pile up a truckload of large rocks and build a brush pile atop, lay in a couple three bales of hay and make a trail of inexpensive critter food (dry dog kibbles, bird seed, chicken feed, etc.) leading to your newly constructed woodchuck habitat. I had a woodchuck residing under a corner of my barn until I provided a much better home a couple hundred feet away.
Woody used to live under my barn:
http://i36.tinypic.com/34nqe0x.jpg
There's Woody by his new home in front of the brush pile, closer to water too:
http://i38.tinypic.com/25z6rh5.jpg
There's no reason to harm wildlife, they need to live too, and they were there first. I think those who want to live rural but insist on living in a test tube sterile environment are morbidly ill... the same sickos who as hate-filled children enjoyed pulling the wings off butterflys.
http://i36.tinypic.com/id84yq.jpg
http://i36.tinypic.com/wswvp1.jpg
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Phisherman said:

I've successfully trapped groundhogs. I've also smoke bombed them and bludgeoned them with hoes.
The key with trapping is to give them something they really want close to their den and hope for bad weather. Apples are what has worked for me. Watermelon is also supposed to be one of their favorites.. Put a taste in the entrance of the trap and the motherload in the back. *Always close the trap in the evening and reopen in the morning, so that you won't be catching opossums, racoons and skunks.*
With the smoke bombs, hit the holes when you know they are in them, and use multiple bombs. Tape them to the ends of long sticks, light them, and shove them well down into the hole, then close it up.
As for the hoes, a good sharp one and lots of adrenaline are recommended.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
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Pat Kiewicz wrote:

Peanut butter is a universal bait. Sometimes it take a while but I've never failed to catch a groundhog doing damage to my property. Also, while bow hunting deer, I've taken a couple of groundhogs (taste like chicken) and one actually bit my boot while removing an arrow. Fortunately bite did not penetrate. You have to be carefully challenging any trapped animal.
Reminds me of raccoon I caught and pictured:
http://home.comcast.net/~frank.logullo/thief.pdf
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I've trapped and drowned eleven of them this year. I live in the city, but near a rr track which is some kind of groundhog highway. Use a big havafhart and bait with apple pieces with a trail of pieces near where they make their way to the garden. Sometimes they or something else has learned how to eat the apple without getting trapped. Twice this year I got a groundhog in an unbaited trap. I think they were used to getting the apple and trying to find some when there wasn't any tripped the trap. I made a plywood box the trap will fit in to fill with water. Relocating just takes the problem to someone else. They are devils in the garden and their holes break the legs of livestock. Another one of those animals that overpopulate when man kills off the predators.
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Twice this

I use Victor Tin Cats for mice. They will catch mice with no bait because the mice smell other mice's scent and go in to investigate.
Steve
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Shoot it or catch it in a ave a heart trap and take it at least 5 miles away.
The stuff on the market that claims to keep them away is BULLSHIT. Do not waste your money.
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But do NOT drop it off in MY neighborhood.
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