Groundhog Problem

We have a groundhog under back porch - dug a *huge* hole and apparently has made its way inside the stone foundation. Any suggestions for catching/killing it? I've done a little research on the Internet about trapping it, but it sounds like we've got a slim to none chance of doing that, which is why I'm asking about a more permanent solution. We live in town, so "shoot it" won't work......
Would a stocking full of dog fur help at all? Anyone?
Thanks, Nicole
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Nicole Thompson said:

You can trap younger groundhogs pretty easily with large traps baited with apples, potted lettuce plants and an appropriate lure. (Try bugspray.com for effective lures and good advice).
You might be able to trap a larger groundhog if you set up a trap which is wired open as a 'feeding station' with apples and melon. When you know the animal is used to feeding from the trap, set it to spring.
There are also traps with bottom entries which can be rigged up over a burrow so the animal exits into the trap.
Even in town, some groundhogs get shot... And then there's the neighbor that bowhunts. That's pretty quiet, too...
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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snipped-for-privacy@someplace.net.net (Pat Kiewicz) wrote in message

If you can't shoot them or trap them but still want to drop them dead, you can block up the escape holes and flush water into the open hole. Or, you can scatter bubble gum around the holes. The critters like the sweet stuff but can't pass it. Eventually..... I know it's gross and a bit cruel, but it works.
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On Tue, 25 May 2004 05:25:41 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@someplace.net.net (Pat Kiewicz) wrote:

If you use a metal trap for a groundhog, make sure it is a STRONG one. Groundhogs are very strong animals, and if there is a weak area in the trap they will find it and tear the trap apart to get out. (snip)
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If the hole is accessible, I've had some luck with enlarging it so a trap will fit into it and still close. The only way out of this hole is through the trap. I then cover it so the mesh isn't quite so obvious and put some tasty treat just outside. I've found a 6-pack of broccoli works for me.
Unfortunately, woodchucks dig burrows with two entrances. This means that if the chuck is suspicious of the hole, it will go out the other one.
Note that it is illegal to transport wildlife. If you catch the chuck, the only legal thing to do with it is either dispatch it or release it on your property. Carrying it somewhere else is not legal and very inconsiderate to the people who live somewhere else. Check with your local animal control officer for your options.
If you can find the other hole, you might try a gas bomb. These are small cartridges which generate hydrogen sulfide to kill the occupant of the burrow. If you go this route, find the woodchuck-sized cartridges rather than the small rodent size generally available in the hardware store. The woodchuck size is about 1" or 1.5" in diameter and about 6" long. Around here (MA) Agway carries them. Tape the cartridge to a long stick. Cover one end of the burrow. Get a shovel full of soil ready, light the fuse, shove the stick with the cartridge down into the hole as far as you can, and start filling the hole. The fuses never give you enough time to do it leisurely. Note: if you have a dry stone foundation, you might smell rotten eggs in the basement. Ventilate.
Also note that when digging the burrow, the chuck will go in some direction and make a turn. This makes it difficult for predators that dig to follow the direction of the burrow. It also makes it difficult to get the smoke bomb very far into the burrow. Test with the stick to find the best angle to insert the stick and smoke bomb before lighting it.
If you didn't get the chuck (it might not have been home at the time -- woodchucks may have more than one independent burrow), you will know because the hole will open up again (maybe after a week, when the H2S dissipates).
Nicole Thompson wrote:

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has
in
A Rotty works very well! They are historically cattle herding dogs and instinctively get rid of burrowing animals that could cause cattle to trip. Works for me, Sherman.
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If traping the chuck is successful than try seeing if there is an animal rescue near you often they will relocate the beasty for you and they only ask you give a small donation if you are able we have one in pa near me called schukyll animal refuge. most cities have one or two we've taken an injured owl baby spuirls a chipmunk who kept geting in the house and eating my cereal and a few birds and things and we always got an up date on releases if the animal surrvived the owl was not able to fly ever again but he got a good home with a trainer and he is in a nice home i was sad he could not go free but he is a fat happy bird I hear. so mayby mr chuck can get shipped off to a reserve where he won't cause any more trouble
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has
I prefer to shoot them but neighbors and wife might object. Get a Hav-a-hart trap and relocate groundhog to more affluent neighborhood. Most places, trapping or shooting of groundhogs is not illegal. Frank
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