greener grass on edge of driveway

I live in Upstate New York. It's spring time and my lawn is starting to wake up. In general my lawn looks like it always does in spring... a scruffy mix of green and brown. But I just noticed that a 4" band along the edge of my asphalt driveway looks so much better than the rest of the lawn. The grass is darker and has much less brown. This is on both sides of the driveway, for the entire length.
I'm assuming that since it looks good it IS good. Maybe I can get the rest of my lawn to be like this. So how is this grass different from the rest. I have never used different seed... always a particular blend of kentucky bluegrass. And it looks like the same grass, just greener. So I guess that being adjacent to the driveway makes this grass grow different.
Does anyone know why this would be? - asphalt acidity? - asphalt gets warmer quicker in spring? - driveway gives edges extra water (doubt it... lots of spring rain everywhere, plus snow melt everywhere BUT driveway) - winter salt? (doubt it... I only used about 5 handfuls twice the whole winter) - something else?
Thanks for any insight Buzz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I see similar phenomenon and assume it is asphalt getting hotter. In my case, crabgrass germinates sooner next to driveway and is not suppressed as much by premerg. Because of this, I put it on earlier this year. Frank
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The only reasonable hypthesis seems to be that asphalt is darker and kept clear of snow, so it absorbs the sunlight and warms the soil near the asphalt, that gives the grass near it a chance to break dormancy a little bit earlier.
-S

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank, Snooze... Thanks for the comments. The heat hypothesis makes sense. Especially if you've also noticed an earlier crabgrass emergence. I've always noticed more weeds on the edges of the driveway and road, but always thought this was because there is less soil there and a lot more rocks. I was (am still a little) hoping there is an acidity issue. I could adjust my soils acidity... but I can really adjust it's temperature. Can't hurt to do a few tests. If I find anything, I'll post back.
Thanks Buzz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You guessed it:
1) asphalt gets warmer quicker in spring 2) winter salt (some winter salts are fertilizer and magnesium salts. These will do it. NaCl would tend to set the lawn back.)
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.