Gray Squirrel Problem

Hi,
I have a bunch of gray squirrel in my yard. They've always eaten the bird seed I put in feeder, but I really don't care about that.
Recently however, a gray squirrel was gnawing on a Burning Bush shrub that has been under the bird feeders for about 4 years now.
I've never seen a gray squirrel try to eat a shrub before.
Does anyone know if this is a common problem, or just a temporary oddity. The bush was just setting out new leaves as it is mid spring where I live (coastal NH).
Any recommended solutions besides moving the bush or the feeders?
Thanks.
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when you find a cure for "squirrels", let me know - we'll make a fortune :-)
PS - squirrel gravy is the best gravy, period. (seriously)

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We had a terrible rabbit and squirrel problem until a new neighbor moved into the next house down the road. They have two huge altered male cats. These cats prowl through our gardens and yard several times a day. Within 2 years both the rabbits and squirrels have become close to extinct. The quail also stay away.
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You may need 5 or 6 of the gray squirrels, as these are a bit smaller than others. They are easily caught in a trap baited with peanut butter. Our local red-tailed hawks tend to thin out the squirrel population too.
SQUIRREL SOUP. Wash and quarter three or four good sized squirrels; put them on, with a small tablespoonful of salt, directly after breakfast, in a gallon of cold water. Cover the pot close, and set it on the back part of the stove to simmer gently, _not_ boil. Add vegetables just the same as you do in case of other meat soups in the summer season, but especially good will you find corn, Irish potatoes, tomatoes and Lima beans. Strain the soup through a coarse colander when the meat has boiled to shreds, so as to get rid of the squirrels' troublesome little bones. Then return to the pot, and after boiling a while longer, thicken with a piece of butter rubbed in flour. Celery and parsley leaves chopped up are also considered an improvement by many. Toast two slices of bread, cut them into dice one-half inch square, fry them in butter, put them into the bottom of your tureen, and then pour the soup boiling hot upon them. Very good.
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I have had good luck stopping the tree rats from digging in my flower beds with a dusting of blood meal. but this morning I heard about people spraying fox urine on stuff to keep chippies from digging/chewing. if all else fails, try some tanglefoot on the bush. Ingrid
toonartist snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List at http://weloveteaching.com/puregold / sign up: http://groups.google.com/groups/dir?hl=en&q=puregold&qt_s=Group+lookup www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I receive no compensation for running the Puregold list or Puregold website. I do not run nor receive any money from the ads at the old Puregold site. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Zone 5 next to Lake Michigan
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I use a big bulk bag of cayenne pepper from a health food store. It's cheaper there. Sprinkle around planting beds or whatever you want to keep the little stinkers out of. It has always worked for me, or course you need to reapply after a rain.
wrote:

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On 3 May 2006 13:56:05 -0700 in
toonartist snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com graced the world with this thought:

~ 4-5 squirrels, cut into serving pieces ~ Original Allegro marinade ~ garlic powder ~ salt ~ pepper ~ Creole seasoning ~ your favorite bbq sauce ~ foil
Place meat in a large ziplock bag and cover with the marinade. Refrigerate at least 1 hour. Overnight is better.
Line a 9 x 13 baking pan with foil. Make the foil big enough so you can fold over the top and seal.
Place the meat on the foil and season with garlic powder, salt, pepper and creole seasoning.
Wrap the foil over the top and seal. Bake for 2 hours at 350 degrees.
While squirrel is cooking, pre-heat your grill.
When squirrel is done, remove it from foil and place on grill. Baste with bbq sauce.
Grill over medium heat until sauce starts to get sticky. Do not overcook! you don't want the meat to get tough!
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