Grass and lawn rebuilding

Hello,
I am in Southern Canada. Recently, my steel cribbed water well collapsed and I had to get a new one bored and sleeved with a fiberglass casing.
From the heavy equipment and ground disturbance I have one hell of a mess in my back yard. Mainly sand overtop my existing grass... I scraped most of it down with a backhoe and filled in the old well with it.
How would you suggest replanting grass in the spring? Should I just get a load of topsoil and lay the grass seed to it overtop of the old stuff? or Should I bring in a bobcat and remove the old topsoil before putting the new topsoil and seed down.?
I'm also thinking of just levelling the mess I have and laying sod over everything...old grass etc,
Thanks for any constructive comments...Jim
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my thoughts, for what it is worth, is keep your existing soil (unless it is really bad stuff). If it has worked well up to now keep it. It is accustomed to your back yard and if it is reasonably fertile why spend money replacing something that is useful.
Whether you need to till the rest of the sand in to the soil or add some extra soil or organic matter to create new levels you have not said but what you have is likely to be best for your garden.
If the soil is quite sandy already you may turn over some compost in to the soil along with any remaining sand to create a decent soil mix. If you bring in new soil you can also bring in new seed and weeds.
Whether you level and reseed or sod is another choice, I myself prefer seeding. Sod seems like sodding hard work.
rob
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Sod....you can get it at Home Depot for about $2.89 for 4x1 roll. You can't buy the seed/fertilizer/soil/water for that much, not to mention the time of your daily labor required

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What's the soil type, what's the soil temp now, and are you a bit of a gambler?
The issue with heavy equipment is almost always that the weight of the equipment squeezes out the airspaces in the soil. So the first thing I'd do would be aerate.
If you can do that promptly and if the soil temperatures are still in the 50oF range, I'd then overseed and water with good grass seed. If you need something to hold the soil over the winter, and you intend to replant next spring, buckwheat might be an option, and it's easy to till in when you're ready to plant grass.
I'd be leery of putting down sod this time of year, especially on compacted soils.
Kay
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