Grapevine pruned too late?

Hello
My first post! I need advice quick please.
We have a large grapevine and although we pruned it early in the year today we took off a branch that was in the way. Problem is, the cut i dripping sap (one drip every other second or so). Do we need to sto this in some way? Will it harm the grapevine?
Your thoughts warmly welcomed
-- Bagman
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Grapes can be pruned any time (though the ideal time is early in winter dormancy)... and a little dripping of sap at the site of cuts is of little consequence. I'm guessing that your vines are already leafing out. It is ok to prune them now but yes, you will see a fair amount of dripping when you're done. Dont' worry, grape vines, from the very first year, need to be pruned...and pruned almost brutally. Aside from those long canes that are allowed to remain for training and shaping purposes (as in working them across an arbor or trellis, or along a fence), all other canes are ideally reduced to 2" or 3" long stubs (with 2 or 3 buds on each) ....every year after dormancy begins in the fall. If you were to watch professional vineyard pruners work, you'd be genuinely appalled at the extent of pruning!
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http://homeorchard.ucdavis.edu/Grape.shtml
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/selectnewpest.grapes.html
http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/hort/g06090.htm
Pruning is one of the most important and most neglected practices in home plantings of grapes. Grapes need some form of support, and pruning (training) is necessary to develop the plant and to maintain it on the support provided. Regular, purposeful pruning is essential for controlling the number, position and vigor of fruiting canes and the yield and quality of the fruit. Grapes should be pruned during the dormant season, late November to March. Since winter injury of fruiting canes will occur to some extent, late winter pruning generally is preferred. If pruning is delayed until near bud swell, the cuts commonly ooze sap abundantly. Though not desirable, "bleeding" seems to be of minor importance.
Pruning at planting time
The best cane usually is selected and shortened to two buds. All other canes are removed.
Sometimes a plant is especially vigorous and has one cane that will reach the lower wire or beyond. In this case, the cane may be cut at the height of the lower wire and tied tautly to it. When new shoots are about 1 inch long, remove them except for the upper two or three near the wire. De-shooting is illustrated in Figure 4. From among the shoots allowed to develop, one will be selected to complete the trunk.
Second year Select the most vigorous cane and remove all others. If the cane is long enough to reach the top wire, cut it off at that height and tie tautly to the wire (Figure 5a). A shorter cane would simply be pruned and tied to the lower wire ( Figure 5b). Plants having no canes long enough to reach the lower wire should be pruned as a newly set plant (one cane shortened to two buds
Early in the second growing season, some cane selection for the next year may be possible on the larger, more vigorous plants. When new shoots are 1 to 3 inches long, remove all but three or four arising from near each wire.
Flower or fruit clusters are best removed as noticed. Plants bearing no fruit make stronger vine growth.
Third year In the dormant period preceding the third year, the more vigorous plants should consist of a main stem or trunk reaching to one or both trellis wires and having several canes. Considering position and vigor, select two of the best canes at each wire and remove the others. Shorten the selected canes leaving two to four buds on each. See Figure 6.
Plants pruned and tied to the lower wire in the second year may be pruned as in Figure 7.
Plant pruned and tied to lower wire in previous year -- (a) unpruned; (b) after pruning; (c) long cane tied to upper wire completing development of trunk.
The two to four buds left on the short canes will give rise to shoots that will bear some fruit. They also will be the source from which to choose next year's fruiting canes.
Fourth year Beginning in the fourth season, the plant should have two or more canes extending in both directions at each wire. Select a fruiting cane and where possible a renewal spur at each of the four arms. Figure 8 illustrates a typical plant before and after pruning. Note that renewal spurs were chosen from canes nearest the trunk. This is important for maintaining fruiting wood close to the trunk and keeping the whole plant within its allotted space. Where this is not practiced, the fruiting wood develops farther from the plant each year, crowding adjacent plants and weakening growth.
Select the fruiting canes with the following considerations in mind: moderate vigor (diameter and length), reasonably straight, originating near the trunk, and reasonably close to the appropriate trellis wires. All other growth is removed, including any sucker growth arising on the lower trunk. Shorten the selected fruiting canes leaving six to 10 buds. Leave more or fewer buds depending on plant vigor -- 10 to 12 buds on vigorous plants, four to six on weaker plants.
In the following years, pruning will not be greatly different from fourth year pruning. Where a renewal spur was present during the preceding growing season, it is frequently the nearest source from which to select a fruiting cane. Thus, the old arm with numerous canes attached can be removed with one cut made near the trunk. If no renewal spur is present, select a cane elsewhere and if possible, leave a spur for use the following year.
The number of buds left per cane may be increased to about 10 to 12 on plants of good vigor. Again, number of buds left should be adjusted according to plant vigor.
Nicole
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dont worry. they wont sap to death. I do a couple trimmings mid and late summer to make sure sun gets to the clusters. doesnt hurt them a bit. Ingrid

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Thank you all! Much relieved we aren't going to kill our grapevine (i
has been here about 20 years).
Much appreciated
-- Bagman
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You can cut it to the ground and you will still not kill it.

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I just pruned my grapes and my neighbor's grapes yesterday. While I certainly don't recommend such a practice, it happens about every 5 years for me. Some winters I'm out of town too much; other winters I'm just overloaded; this winter I was ill.
Obviously I prefer to prune in very late winter. Amazingly, the plants are extremely forgiving. I've been growing my own grapes for over 30 years. The crop seems to suffer a bit from very late heavy pruning, but other factors are much more detrimental: Failure to prune at all, irrigation practices, insect attacks; etc.
What you have done should be very safe. Plants are very adept at healing themselves. Relax and look forward to your harvest.
Good luck, Gideon
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