Grape Seedlings

I have some volunteer grapes starting from a pile of seed I dumped last fall. Are they worth saving?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pat Keith wrote:

This depends on the variety of the grape. If the seeds were from Concord, Catawba, or other American varieties, they can grow quite well. If they were from a European variety, they are highly susceptable to a root disease that will eventually kill the plant. European grapes are grafted onto American rootstock, even in Europe.
Note that you might not get exactly the same fruit as the parent. I don't know if grapes bread true from seed. The usual method of propagation of American grapes is through cuttings and of European grapes is through grafting onto rooted American cuttings.
--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since you mentoin europe, the reason for grafting you imply is probably Phylloxera. Variables such as clay, sand, moisture affect the insect's lifecycle and spread. (i may have read that elswhere than in the textbook linked below.)
I strongly doubt that mass retail (walmart, home depot) grapes are grafted. But if so, you'd see the graft when buying the plant.
AFAIK, all amer and hyb are susceptible to phylloxera. even most (all?) of the 'resistant' rootstocks have been damaged by phylloxera in some vineyard conditions. but this is economically irrelevant for homeowners.

European cvs grow very readily from winter cuttings in decent soil or mix. American and hybrids vary in ease. muscadines are quite different.
To answer the OP question, "Are they worth saving?": the seedlings will differ from the parent, i.e., usually 'inferior'. However, ALL PLANT CULTIVARS ORIGINATE AS SEEDLINGS (though a few cultivars originate as mutations from existing similar cultivars) so grow the seedlings if/where you have space and water. Never baby them, because 'abusable' cvs are the most valuable. If they get badly diseased or big_before_flowering, nub them off (at the ground).
Selection strategies for 'compact' or 'dwarf' cvs are more.. um. complex. :-)
------------ see the easier reading textbooks at your library such as http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&q=general+viticulture&spell=1 that outline training etc. etc. etc. ------------
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8 &q=phylloxera+nematode+ipm+Grape+%7C+vitis ------------
http://www.winepros.org/wine101/viniculture.htm
http://www.uga.edu/fruit/grape.htm ------------
check the coop ext web pages of states in your area. diverse and regional cvs:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=texas+Grape +% 7C+vitis+Munson&btnG=Search
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=site:lists%2Eibiblio % 2Eorg+Grape+%7C+vitis+%7C+swensen%27s
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=site % 3Alists.ibiblio.org+Grape+%7C+vitis++minnesota+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.