Gooseberries and hot weather

Hello all --
I recently ordered two Gooseberry plants ('Invicta' and 'Hinnonmaki Red' cultivars). I've read that gooseberries "collapse" when the air temperature exceeds 85 degrees: I live about half a mile from the south shore of Lake Erie, so the summers aren't like Arizona, but typically there are a few days or weeks during the summer that exceed the 85-degree mark, and it's usually the case where we get at least one week that goes into the 90's. So, I intend to plant them in large containers so they can be temporarily moved indoors if necessary.
It seems a shame, though, since that means they would probably not reach their full size, and there's a spot on the north side of the house that would otherwise be ideal for them. Is there another way to protect gooseberries from high summer temperatures (e.g. covering them with wet fabric, etc. ?) Or might these varieties survive a week of 90-ish temperatures anyways?
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AlleyCatStudio1 wrote:

I'm not sure what you mean by "collapse". I had some Jostaberries for a few years (they are a gooseberry x black current hybrid) and they grew very well here in southern Minnesota, where the summers usually get in the 90's. I finally pulled them out because they weren't very productive, but that could have been because I couldn't tell how to prune them. They didn't grow like normal gooseberries or currents, they were more bushlike. The one year they did produce well the summer was unseasonably cool. That may have been a coincidence. The plants never wilted, even when the temperature would occasionally approach 100.
If you live near the Great Lakes, gooseberries should do fine.
Best regards, Bob
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Bob wrote:

temperature
I'm not sure either; but that's what online articles such as this one say: http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/gooseberry.html

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.combustible (AlleyCatStudio1) wrote in message

This article is about growing gooseberries in California, a place with a hotter, drier climate than the Great Lakes. Gooseberries do best in more humid climates with a distinct prolonged chill period---climates such as yours.
Quit worrying about what applies in California--you don't live there.
J. Del Col
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AlleyCatStudio1 said:

I could not keep gooseberries or black currants going here in Plymouth, even in partial shade. My soil is way to sandy and dries (and warms) very quickly. One summer it was just too warm and dry and the next spring they were dead.
The neighbor where I used to live had a nice row of red currants which did very well. We had heavy soil with a high water table -- they were never stressed for water, even in the drought of '88. (The water table was high enough that we had crayfish burrows in the low spots in our back yards! The currants were planted on a raised-up spot so that they weren't waterlogged.)
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

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'Hinnonmaki Red'

air temperature

shore of Lake

are a few days or

it's usually the

So, I intend to

moved indoors if

Don't even think about growing them in containers. Sure it can be done but you will have to carry so much water to them that your life will be miserable! The amount of water a mature bush requires is phenomenal, especially at those temperatures.
In any case, it's likely to make the problem worse rather than better because roots are even more sensitive to high temperatures than leaves and shoots.
Put them in the ground - they'll be fine and grow better too.
-- Gerry www.garden-guide.net ... for responsible gardening
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.combustible (AlleyCatStudio1) wrote in message

You won't have any problem. I grow them in WV, and we have plenty of days hotter than 85F. The bush bears heavily and has never "collapsed."
J. Del Col
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In the past I grew gooseberries, and we often reach 100F in the summer. They never seemed to suffer from the heat. They did get some late afternoon shade. I had good crops for a few years; what finally caused me to yank them was the gooseberry saw fly, which I grew tired of battling.
Black currants do very well for me, both the Crandall, which is lovely and smells like cloves in bloom, and the Consort. I had Jostaberries for 10 years, and they grew vigorously, but never bore much fruit.
Good luck and have fun, Sue
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Agreed. Our gooseberry is very productive also with weather sometimes above 100F and mostly in the high 90s all summer. They are also under an overgrown lilac in full shade. (In the Idaho desert, zone 6) Our neighbor has a very productive currant in the shade. I'm transplanting some this year to see how they like full sun :-o My guess is they will probably burn up, but I have to try, because it's a spot I'd really like to have them grow.
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Thanks for all the answers, everybody! And if they'll produce in full shade, that would be super too, as there are other spots along the northern side of the house which have ideal soil conditions, but are shaded by other bushes and the house next door.
Now my only other question is how long I have to wait until they'll bear enough fruit to make a tart!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.combustible (AlleyCatStudio1) wrote in message

The site you referred to answers that question---about two years from cuttings.
J. Del Col
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J. Del Col wrote:

cuttings.
Hmmm, doesn't say how much, though. :-/
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.combustible (AlleyCatStudio1) wrote in message

If they are growing well, you'll get plenty. Be patient.
J. Del Col
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.combustible (AlleyCatStudio1) wrote in message

Don't bother with the containers. Keep them well watered, and you will have no problems.
J. Del Col
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