Good trees for climbing or treehouse

I need a few choices for a tree with good, strong branches for kids to climb in or for building a treehouse. It can be evergreen or deciduous; fast growing preferred, but moderate growth is allright. The tree can max out at about 25-30' I live in zones 20-21 of the Sunset book which is East of Los Angeles about 30 miles. Temps usually range from high 30's to over 100 degrees.
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On 11/2/07 11:09 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@z24g2000prh.googlegroups.com,

And just how long are you planning to wait for this treehouse tree to be ready for building?
C
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I would say it would be used more for climbing than a treehouse. I'm actually researching this for my friends. They want a tree for their son to climb in but also might be used for a treehouse someday if they decide to build one. Let's assume it's for a treehouse. I guess it should be something fast growing that maybe in three or four years might be ready to build a treehouse. That's why i came here for suggestions. Hopefully this gives you more info to offer ideas. Regards.
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Nothing comes to mind. Trees for houses are usually "there" on the land when people build. We had a couple tree houses built in elms, which of course died in the plague. There are some good sized maples, but a tree house needs a very thick, sturdy trunk too or the whole thing can come over. Fast growing trees are not sturdy. it is time to think about a fort on stilts with bushes and trees planted around it. Ingrid
On Sat, 03 Nov 2007 09:43:31 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

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Unless you/they are willing to pay substantial amounts of money to have a very large tree brought in I think you are out of luck as regards tree houses for a child already born. It's not too early to be planning for the grandkids treehouse, though.
I have purchased trees this large in the past so it can be done. You need to contact a local nursery to find out what size trees are available, go for the largest they can offer, and wait 3 or more years for it to get well established.
How old are these kids now?? :)
--
Toni
Hills of Kentucky
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One kid is 5 and the other is one year old. I think they would rather have a tree for climbing. I think several oak species would work but they grow too slowly. I'll keep researching. Thanks.
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"shareyourknowle wrote:

Have you ever actually sat and watched a tree grow? Even the fastest growers suitable for climbing will need some 50 years to go from respectable sapling to climbable, add another 50 years for it to support a tree house. You're much too old, even your children are too old, but if you plant say a sycamore now your grand children might enjoy climbing it's branches and their children may be able to have a tree house among it's limbs. And sycamores grow relatively fast, become very large, and for a fast grower are exceptionally sturdy wooded. But regardless what tree you plant there are never any guarantees it will survive (it's a living thing after all), so you should consider planting a few, and for such treess to give them teh best opportunity to fulfill your wishes you need to be prepared to devote a minimum of as full unobstructed 1/4 acre per tree, and even if it thrives it may not grow with a configuration suitable for your wishes, not even with the most professional care/pruning. And trees are naturally susceptible to all sorts of diseases, and they are at the mercy of the weather... some yesrs you'll actually see noticeable growth, some years so little growth you'll be hard pressed to say for sure if it grew even an inch and some years trees actually lose some stature, storms can wreak havoc on tree limbs.
I think your best bet is to head down to your local lumber yard and there you will find How To books for back yard climbables, gym sets of all type/sizes and club houses and combo units. Thinking you will plant a tree now for your kids to climb you have to truly believe you are on another planet, in some other far away galaxy.
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On Nov 2, 9:09 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

Throughout the South several generations back, when children actually played outdoors, the tree of choice was primarily the Chinaberry tree. It grew relatively fast (~10 years for child weight bearing), made a good shade, had fragrant blooms, and produced an abundance of berries just the right size for a bamboo pea-shooter. Many a "battle" was fought between kids in trees in adjoining properties. In wooded areas I still locate old homesites with little-to-no visible structures simply by looking for Chinaberry trees. The tree is considered invasive and toxic in some areas, therefore not desireable. Yet tens of thousands of us grew up playing in these trees without ill effects.
Red
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Hi Red- Are you referring to Melia azedarach? It will grow here but i believe the berries are poisonous. Oh well. I was in the nursery industry for many years, but this question was never asked, so i wasn't knowledgable about what trees were good. Oaks should work but they grow so darn slow. Ill let my friends know. They might want to re- think this. Regards.
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