ginkgo fruit

I'm interested in planting a female ginkgo tree. Does it still make the stinky fruit if it's not pollinated? There aren't any ginkgo trees close by. Although there are probably some within a few miles. I don't remember ever having seen a ginkgo tree around here. So I don't think it would be pollinated. From surfing around, I think it probably doesn't.
Actually, I've also read that the fruit doesn't start getting really stinky until it drops on the ground. So perhaps if you have one dropping fruit in the back yard, you can just pick up the fruit as it falls, to avoid stink.
To answer some of the inevitable side-questions: I don't want the pollen of a male tree. It seems you can buy a female tree, though harder to find than the male.
Laura
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snipped-for-privacy@adore.lightlink.com (Lacustral) wrote:

The apricot-like structures produced by female ginkgo trees are technically not fruits, but are the seeds having a shell that consists of a soft and fleshy section (the sarcotesta), and a hard section (the sclerotesta). The seed shells form whether or not they are fertilized.

The seed shells contain butanoic acid and smell like rancid butter, parmesan cheese, and vomit.
Ginkgo pollen can be strongly allergenic. Allergans ginkgols and ginkgolic acids can cause contact reactions of mucous membranes, resulting in cheilitis and GI irritation.
Contact with the fleshy fruit pulp causes allergic dermatitis, similar to poison ivy. Constituents alkylbenzoic acid, alkylphenol, and their derivatives cause reactions of this type. Allergic dermatitis such as erythema, edema, blisters, and itching have all been reported. A cross-allergenicity exists between ginkgo fruit pulp and poison ivy. Ginkgolic acid and bilobin are structurally similar to the allergens of poison ivy, mango rind, and cashew nut shell oil. Contact with the fruit pulp causes erythema and edema, with the rapid formation of vesicles accompanied by severe itching. Symptoms last 7 to 10 days.
Uncooked ginkgo seeds contain a chemical known as ginkgotoxin, which can cause seizures. Ingestion of two pieces of pulp has been reported to cause perioral erythema, rectal burning, and painful spasms of the anal sphincter.
Perhaps you should try another plant.
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METASEQUOIA: As a follow up, if you are looking for another tree consider the Metasequoia glyptostroboides (dawn redwood). It is also a prehistoric Chinese tree.
Until 1945 the dawn redwood was known only in the form of fossils collected by paleobotanists and was thought to have been extinct for perhaps a million years. After it was discovered alive and well in the remote village of Motao-chi in the Chinese province of Szechwan, the Arnold Arboretum of Boston sent a special expedition to the area. The seeds collected were shared with other botanical gardens around the world, and this deciduous conifer is now widely available from nurserymen.
Mature trees in China are broadly conical and grow about 100 feet tall from thick buttressed roots. Presumably they will eventually attain a similar size in this country--young plants grow 3 feet or more a year--making them too tall for the average garden. On a large lawn, however, they can attract attention not only for their history but for their foliage. Soft, bright green needles, about 3/4 inch long, appear in early spring, then turn pinkish brown before falling in the autumn. Brown cones 3/4 inch long ripen each year.
Dawn redwood is hardy to Zone 5. It thrives in full sun in almost any moist soil. Because it tends to continue growing until late in the summer, it should be planted in a location not subject to early frosts-- thus plant on a hillside rather than in a valley. Growth is symmetrical and pruning is not necessary.
GINKGO: Regarding Ginkgo, there are no known forests of ginkgoes, even in China, where Western travelers first found them in the 17th Century growing in temple gardens. These few cultivated trees turned out to be living relics of prehistoric times, among the last survivors of one of the first groups of plants that abandoned spore propagation for the more efficient seed method. The impressions of their ancestors' leaves may be seen in various parts of the world, including the United States, in rocks that are known to be millions of years old. The tree is called maidenhair tree because the 4-inch smooth green leaves resemble those of the maidenhair fern. They are fan-shaped, tough and completely free of insects and diseases, and turn a lovely shade of yellow in fall. The Chinese have another name for the ginkgo that is derived from the shape of its leaves: they call it "the tree with leaves like a duck's foot."
The ginkgo is not the tree for every backyard. One reason is that it eventually reaches a height of up to 80 feet with a spread of 40 feet or more, but another factor of importance is that it needs nearly 20 years to get over the gawky stages of adolescence and develop the broadly spreading branches of maturity. Young trees 8 to 10 feet tall may require 10 to 12 years to reach 20 feet in height. When they are young, ginkgoes are characterized by long ascending branches that develop asymmetrically. Once recommended for urban plantings because it tolerated fumes and dust, the ginkgo has been discovered to be among the first trees damaged by air pollutants.
Nurserymen generally sell only the male trees.
Both are good trees for the home landscape since they have deep roots and other plants such as rhododendrons and azaleas can be planted under them.
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while true, there are some redeeming features of Ginkgo trees. we have one planted in my Gr'ma's memory at the dacha. Ingrid
"The shelled seeds of the ginkgo are edible and are traditionally consumed in China. The seeds are considered to have health benefits by some, but more commonly today extracts from the leaves of the ginkgo are included in various health supplements that are purported to improve concentration, memory, and metabolism."

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(Lacustral) wrote:

Good info:
http://www.ginkgo-inc.com /
http://www.xs4all.nl/~kwanten /
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