Getting Rid of Queen Anne's Lace

Just digging it out isn't working, and may not even be possible.
If I remove all the other smaller plants in the area, can I use Roundup, or some other weedkiller, to kill the Queen Anne's Lace?
If not Roundup, what is recommended?
Will the weedkiller hurt lilacs, roses, raspberries, or any other bushes in the area (too large to remove)?
How long after using the weedkiller can the original plants be restored or new ones put in in place of the Queen Anne's Lace? Thanks.
Cori
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On 29 Jul 2006 22:26:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

One plant, or many? Can you gather the plant into a bundle and stuff it into a garbage bag with the bottom removed, then douse it with round-up? shouldn't hurt any plants that you don't put it on.
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Charles wrote:

A whole border. Someone suggested putting the Roundup on a sponge and the sponge directly on any plants I don't want, so as not to damage ones I do want, but I was sort of thinking of moving those plants anyway to redistribute them. It's the ones too large to move about which I'm concerned. Thanks for your suggestion. Maybe it would be best to put the garbage bags around the plants I do want and spray all the others--there are so many more of them!
Cori
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yeah, roundup will work, but you need to use pre-emergent in spring when you put the plants back you want. last year we had 1 plants, this year I have a row, but in spring I pulled a lot to make that one row. I LOVE QAL. Ingrid
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snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.xx.com wrote:

So if I have to wait clear till spring to replace the plants I want, probably I should plan to do all this last thing in the fall?
Cori
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QAL is a very deep rooted plant, I don't think digging will help. Where do you live? QAL grows fairly slowly around here, and is easily controlled. They sprout late in the season, and you can see them all over the place in summer and fall. I think they are not as much of a pest because once the weather gets warm enough for them to grow, it stops raining and they don't get much water. They are, however, a very deep rooted plant, and will still slowly grow and bloom when everything around it has died. I mow them or just pull them out, and they are gone.
Give it a bit of water, and one plant will do this:
http://zootal.no-ip.info/stuff/2006%20July%2029%20Garden/images/DSCF4151.jpg
I expect I'll have a couple million of them next year because of this one plant. My kids like it, I don't have the heart to pull it, so I water it weekly instead and watch it grow.

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"Matthew Reed" <nospam at zootal dot com nospam> wrote in

That's lovely.
How do they propagate -- seeds? tubers? I'd love some in my wildflower garden.
How come plants never seem to grow rogue in the gardens of those who would welcome them?
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FragileWarrior wrote:

Stick a few carrots (buy them at the grocery store; they're cheap) in the ground in your wf garden next year and you will have queen annes lace. It might also work to scatter some carrot seeds in the fall.
Bob
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Wait a minute... QAL and carrots are the same thing?????
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FragileWarrior wrote:

Not quite, but close enough. (QAL roots are white.)
Bob
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Parsnips?
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FragileWarrior wrote:

Not parsnips. (parsnips have yellow flowers) They are carrots, but the roots are white. If you plant carrots in the flowerbed, you get QAL -- but they might grow almost 6 feet tall if you water them (don't ask me how I know this)
Bob
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COOOOOOOL! Tomorrow I shall be planting some carrots in my garden.
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FragileWarrior wrote:

It'll probably work better in the spring, but go for it. :-)
Best regards, Bob
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QAL aka The Wild Carrot aka Daucus Carota is a wild carrot, not the same thing as a domesticated carrot, but a cousin. Here in Oregon it's classified as a class C noxious weed. They are everywhere, but I've not noticed them being that noxious. Maybe if I was a farmer I'd feel otherwise :-P. They don't get very big unless you water them, like I did to a couple - then they get huge. There are a rather pretty wildflower, IMNSHO. It's edible when young, but I don't recommend eating it because there are other similar plants that are poisonous. You might end up eating hemlock by mistake.
http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/queen.html http://oak.ppws.vt.edu/~sforza/weeds/dauca.html http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/weeds.html
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Matthew Reed wrote:

They're not too hard to identify. If you look carefully, QAL has the one purple (or black) flower in the center of the flower head. Water-Hemlock is all white, and it grows mostly in marshy ground.
If you want confusing, talk about making hemlock tea... In the PNW thats made from the hemlock tree, and its unfortunately (and confusingly) named.
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They propagate like seeds, like a carrot. They are supposed to be perrenials, but my observations make me think they might be annuals - IE they bloom the first year when planted from seeds. I'm going to save the seeds from mine and plant a few next year and see how they do.
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Matthew Reed wrote:

with a stick. I know my battle is futile because a huge batch grows on the other side of the fence from the batch I'm trying to eliminate. A few years back, a lady who wanted a wildflower garden there cut, dug, beat, burned, and poisoned the lot of them. They were sickly for about a year, then came back stronger than ever. Once mine are gone, IF EVER, I will have to watch those on the other side of the fence and cut them the minute they show signs of going to seed, and even then I'm afraid the roots may creep under the fence the minute I turn my back.
Digging thins them temporarily, but in a year or two they are as thick as ever. It's bound to be an ongoing battle, but I'd like to give some other things a chance, being as along that fence is about the ONLY area of the yard with ANY sun.
A lady from a nursery was over Sunday and said Roundup will harm my lilac, raspberries, roses, and two other bushes I want but don't know the names of, so the plants around those will have to be either dug, or poisoned with EXTREME care. The poison seems to "take" better the more of the plant foliage is above ground to poison, so I've stopped mowing them. She also said that pre-emergent in the spring is a good idea, so I will plan on removing all the other plants that will (be small enough to remove), poisoning what can be safely done, digging the rest, then using the pre-emergent in the spring before replacing the other plants.
Cori
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

QAL is feral (incorrectly, "wild") carrot. Exactly the same species, _Daucus carota_, but naturally re-selected for survival in the wild. Carrot/QAL is a bienniel as are many of its relatives. Any plant blooming this year will be gone next year. Cutting off the flower heads will prevent seeding.
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