get rid of blackberries????

Ok, I'd really like my yard back. How can I get rid of blackberries?
Do I have to kill all the vegetayion or will a certain weedkiller do
-- chrispi ----------------------------------------------------------------------- chrispi2's Profile: http://www.gardenerforums.com/member.php?useridView this thread: http://www.gardenerforums.com/showthread.php?t 2
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you can't kill blackberries, you can only control them. sort of. :-)
we use lawn and lots of mowing and pruning. the thicker your lawn, the less likely they are to invade your yard. my builder said that when they cleared the land for my house, there were blackberries running all the way to the top of our large maple tree. i'm glad they had the machinery to clear them out before we moved in!
-kelly
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When we bought this house six years ago it had mainly blackberries in the backyard. I dug up the enormous roots with great effort. The blackberries came back the next year & I dug them up again. The year after that only one blackberry briar reappeared. Since then, nothing but an occasional seedling that i pull out before it gets a real root on it. Now if only the morning glories were that easy.
-paghat the ratgirl
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*sigh* i wish we could do that... our yard is bordered by a protected native growth area. it's filled with blackberries. they try to spread into our yard constantly, but i can't legally pull up the roots.
they do make good jam, though.
-kelly
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If they're the enormous Himalayan blackberries we have here, this is an invasive species, & not protected. It should be legal to remove them from protected native growth areas because for so long as the giant blackberries are there, native species haven't much chance.
-paggers
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The Ergonica Weed Twister could help you pull out some of the smaller seedlings by the roots. The larger plants would require more hardware, however.
Ray _____________________________________________ Talk about weeds: World of Weeds www.ergonica.com.
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there are several types in there, and raspberries, and salmon berries... it might be painful to try to sort them out. :-)
-kelly
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culprit wrote:

If they are the Himalayn blackberry they are not native to any part of North America so there should be no problem removing them from your property even is some of them in the greenbelt die also. For more info see the link below.
http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/moredocs/rubdis01.pdf
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You can apply roundup in late summer or fall to the portion that is on your property. [Representatives from Monsanto recommend a 2:1 tank mix of glyphosate (Round-up) with triclopyr (Garlon 3a), with Round-up rates at 2% or less and Garlon 3a rates at 1% or less. Be sure to add most of the water to your mix of glyphosate before adding the Garlon 3a to avoid incompatibility problems.]
Since it is a systemic, it will kill the roots that are feeding that branch. If the protected area is a wetlands, use Rodeo (Dow) or Aquamaster (Monsanto).
Actually Himalayan Blackberries [Rubus armeniacus or Rubus discolor or Rubus procerus] are alien invasive species from Western Europe. They are not native. So if your protected area is for native plants, then you are doing a service by killing the blackberries. See: http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/esadocs/rubudisc.html
Other alien species of blackberries are not considered invasive. They are:
Rubus laciniatus (cutleaf blackberry) Rubus linkianus (Link's blackberry) Rubus macrophyllus (largeleaf blackberry) Rubus thyrsoides (Great Britain blackberry) Rubus tomentosus (woolly blackberry) Rubus triphyllus (threeleaf blackberry) Rubus ulmifolius (elmleaf blackberry) Rubus vestitus (European blackberry)
A good control manual is at: http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/moredocs/rubdis01.pdf
There are a number of blackberries that are native to the USA. They are not considered invasive except Rubus argutus. They include:
Rubus allegheniensis (Allegheny blackberry) Rubus alumnus (oldfield blackberry) Rubus andrewsianus (Andrews' blackberry) Rubus arcticus (arctic blackberry) Rubus argutus (sawtooth or prickly Florida blackberry) invasive Rubus arvensis (field blackberry) Rubus audax (Tampa blackberry) Rubus audax (Tampa blackberry) Rubus bicknellii (Nantucketblackberry) Rubus bigelovianus (lowland blackberry) Rubus burnhamii (Burnham's blackberry) Rubus bushii (Bush's blackberry) Rubus canadensis (smooth blackberry) Rubus concameratus (West Virginia blackberry) Rubus conanictuensis (Conanicut Islandblackberry) Rubus cuneifolius (sand blackberry) Rubus defectionis (eclipse blackberry) Rubus densissimus (Morgantown blackberry) Rubus dissimilis (bristly Oswego blackberry) Rubus elegantulus (showy blackberry) Rubus exeter (Baton Rouge blackberry) Rubus flavinanus (Windham County blackberry) Rubus floricomus (manyflower blackberry), Rubus florulentus (big blackberry) Rubus frondisentis (leafy blackberry) Rubus frondosus (yankee blackberry) Rubus fryei (Cacapon River blackberry) Rubus fruticosus (shrubby blackberry) Rubus glandicaulis (glandstem blackberry) Rubus gnarus (Pollock's Mill blackberry) Rubus griseus (Loogootee blackberry) Rubus gulosus (New Brunswick blackberry) Rubus hawaiensis (Hawai'i blackberry) Rubus hanesii (Hanes' blackberry) Rubus heterophyllus (ecotone blackberry) Rubus immanis (Watauga River blackberry) Rubus impar (Posey County blackberry) Rubus insons (New England blackberry) Rubus insulanus (island blackberry) Rubus inclinis (marshland blackberry) Rubus inferior (Ocala blackberry) Rubus ithacanus (Ithaca blackberry) Rubus junceus (herbaceous blackberry) Rubus kelloggii (Kellogg's blackberry) Rubus kennedyanus (Kennedy's blackberry) Rubus laudatus (plains blackberry) Rubus lawrencei (Adirondack blackberry) Rubus latens (Massachusetts blackberry) Rubus longii (Long's blackberry) Rubus mollior (softleaf blackberry) Rubus montensis (mountaintop blackberry) Rubus multiformis (variable blackberry) Rubus multispinus (devil's blackberry) Rubus navus (Grand Lake blackberry) Rubus noveboracus (New York blackberry) Rubus oklahomus (Oklahoma blackberry) Rubus originalis (Cold Spring blackberry) Rubus ortivus (Mt. Desert Island blackberry) Rubus ostryifolius (highbush blackberry) Rubus pascuus (Chesapeake blackberry) Rubus parcifrondifer (Silver Creek blackberry) Rubus paludivagus (Cape Cod blackberry) Rubus pernagaeus (Smithfield blackberry) Rubus pensilvanicus (Pennsylvania blackberry) Rubus pergratus (upland blackberry) Rubus persistens (persistent blackberry) Rubus philadelphicus (Philadelphia blackberry) Rubus prestonensis (Terra Alta blackberry) Rubus probabilis (tree blackberry) Rubus probativus (Birmingham blackberry) Rubus pubescens (dwarf red blackberry) Rubus pubifolius (Eagle Rock blackberry) Rubus pugnax (pugnacious blackberry) Rubus randolphiorum (Plymouth blackberry) Rubus recurvans (recurved blackberry) Rubus rosa (rose blackberry) Rubus rossbergianus (Connecticut blackberry) Rubus rosarius (James River blackberry) Rubus russeus (Halifax blackberry) Rubus rydbergianus (Rydberg's blackberry) Rubus saltuensis (Tolland County blackberry) Rubus sceleratus (Androscoggin River blackberry) Rubus setosus (setose blackberry) Rubus semisetosus (swamp blackberry) Rubus sewardianus (Seward's blackberry) Rubus spectatus (sphagnum blackberry) Rubus suus (branched blackberry) Rubus trux (Lookout Mountain blackberry) Rubus tygartensis (Taylor County blackberry) Rubus ucetanus (Hillsborough blackberry) Rubus ursinus (California blackberry) Rubus variispinus (Vicksburg blackberry) Rubus vermontanus (Vermont blackberry) Rubus wheeleri (Wheeler's blackberry) Rubus wisconsinensis (Wisconsin blackberry)
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chrispi2 wrote:

The best way to get rid of wild blackberries is with a backhoe. Dig deep.
Chemicals aren't very effective. Certainly not at any strength that can legally be applied. I wouldn't be surprised to find blackberries growing around Monsanto's parking lot.
You can cut them down, but they'll grow back. Each place that the cane touches the ground is another potential place for it to set down more roots, and there's only so much you'll be able to pull out without digging. And when you dig around an area where they took over, chances are you'll hit some roots, and sever them, leaving another spot for them to grow back from. Eventually after enough years you'll get it all down to a manageable level, but you will probably never see them totally eradicated unless you scoop-out a foot of soil, and replace it. And even then something might be left behind.
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We used a weedeater with one of those metal attachments. It cleared the area quickly. Then, for two years pull up the sprouts using a pair of pliers. After that, no more berry bushes. We found several springs where the berry bushes were growing, and dug a "natural" 7,000 gallon pond and stocked it with goldfish. The pond has been very successful and the goldfish spawn every spring. I could use fewer frogs, though.
On Wed, 23 Mar 2005 15:29:17 -0500, chrispi2

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Garlon works.

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I have never had any problem getting rid of them. We cut them down to the ground and then mowed the area whenever we mowed the lawn and they never put up a good effort to come back. We now have to be careful not kill off the remaining berrys that we do have. I do think if you take roundup and with a paint brush paint the roots that it will kill them. Make sure though when you paint the roots that they still are above the soil at least three inches. Chuckie
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Cut down to ground level any way you can then maintain with your lawn mower. As long as you mow before the new shoots harden you will win in time.
David
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