Garden shed on lawn

I would like to get a smallish garden shed (8' by 6' for example) for general garden storage, i.e. lawnmower and other garden tools. What I want to know is can I just place this directly on the lawn (the lawn is flat), or do I need foundations of some kind? I live in the North East of Engalnd if this is applicable.
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I would build some sort of foundation. Some put down a concrete slab, others build a framework and fill it with gravel and dirt to set the shed on.
With a foundation you have less chance of water getting into the shed and soaking what ever you have stored there. It also reduces the amount of surprises you will have when you find mice or snakes have made a home there (depending on which type of foundation you choose).
Dwayne

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I am a bit new to all this kind of thing, are there any links detailing either approach?
Thanks.
Dwayne wrote:

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While interviewing various sheds, pay attention to whether they're well made enough that you can fortify them. Crime is random, theft happens, and if you attach a hefty padlock to a cardboard door, nothing is achieved. Some sheds aren't much more than that.
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Yes, you really should use a foundation. It doesn't have to be concrete. Our 8x12 shed is placed on top of a simple wood construted foundation.
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Thanks, for the info.
Not wanting to sound TOO stupid, but I would really like specifics about the wooden frame. For example for your 8'x12' case, do I just need two 8'x2"x2" and two 12'x2"x2" bits of wood, nail them up into a square and then that's it, or would I require something more elaborate?
Thanks again.
Jangchub wrote:

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wrote:

How about three 4x8 foot sheets of 3/4" thick plywood, laid over a frame made of treated 2x4" wood? You might need to trim an inch or three off the plywood, unless the internal floor size really is 8'x12'.
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OK, that sounds good to me. Looking at one on the B&Q website it says the base should be 300mm wider than the dimensions specified.
Anyway, this maybe another stupid question, but it can get fairly windy here (not hurricane standards), but I take it there is no fear of these things blowing over????
Thanks.
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

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I'd address the tip-over question directly to the manufacturer, on the telephone. The instructions may contain info about anchoring the structure. Their people should be able to tell you this.
wrote:

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Out of box idea here.....
How abt buying a small utility trailer..something that can be moved around with a car....and using that as a storage shed?
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That might attract tornados, and plastic pink flamingos.
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Only if you place a sofa outside. It helps if you have some elevation but near Zero I'd put the flamingoes in a secure place.
Aside.
My dad built his sheds on a concrete foundation. Foundation was made large and his sheds grew into over time. Given what he could afford and find. He is 84 and still at it. I have none but store plywood and lime in his. Best of all worlds ;)). We live about 100 yards apart with my younger brother in between.
Bill
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Well, here in TX last week we have a servere rain storm and over a thousand trees were torn out of the ground. Anything can up and go. We have a wood construction shed, not plastic or vinyl and we put it in a protected part of the yard as close to the fence the code would allow. It should be okay

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Ours is constructed of 2" x 12' and 2" x4" in whatever dimensions necessary, wood.

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I'd put a shed on a foundation of some sort... concrete, wooden sled base, rock... something. It'll help the longevity of the shed and things stored therein. You'll also want to think about ventilation and security.
In most areas of the country, you'll need a building permit for a shed of above a certain size (8x10 in my county). If you haven't built anything before, you're going to want some experienced help or some good books. Most public libraries have a sslection of books on storage sheds and similar outbuildings; the extension service in your state or in other states often has some pretty good plans, too, as do lumberyards. Here are some extension service building plans from North Dakota, to give you an idea of what's available: http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/abeng/miscplans.htm
Take a look at the vegetable stand for plans of a shed on skids (sled base) as an example of something that could go "directly on the lawn".
Kay

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It just dawned on me that you can use cinder blocks also.

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Don't use a foundation or cinder blocks. A foundation goes all around and you want ventilation. Cinder blocks are made from cinders from coal fires and you want concrete pillars which don't use cinders and have solid bottoms so they don't settle. (If a cement block is set on it's side, it looses it strength.) The manufacturer of the shed usually recommends something depending upon the height they want. Usually solid 4" x 8" x 16" concrete blocks are sufficient. This allows ventillation under the shed.
Here is a good description of how to prepare the site for a storage shed from the manufacturer of "Amish Storage Sheds" in Pennsylvania:
http://www.pastoragesheds.com/site-preparation.asp
They recommend using a base of 3/4" crushed blue stone for the shed, 2-3" deep, 1' larger than the size of the shed. Crushed stone provides better drainage for rain or snow melt around the perimeter of the shed, especially if no gutters will be installed on the shed. Water that splashes directly onto the ground will eventually create a muddy area that will splash up onto the shed walls.
* To prepare a gravel base, remove the sod from an area slightly larger than the shed, level the site by removing dirt where necessary, and spread the gravel to a depth of about three inches. Tamp the gravel down with a piece of 4-by-4 or metal tamper until it is evenly distributed and the site is flat and level.
* An outer "frame" of pressure-treated 4x4's or cement block will help keep the stone in place and create a neater appearance; however, it is not required
* Cement pillars, with or without tie-downs, are required by some municipalities. Check local regulations for quantity and recommended placement. OR use a concrete slab - 3-4" thick.
They specifically state to not use "cinder blocks".
They explain how to install anchors to keep it from blowing away.
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wrote:

Tell that to MOST of the homes in the northeast. Most are built on a cinder block foundation. I think you have your ingredients wrong, but to appease, it would be fine to use cement blocks and leave a few inches every two feet open for ventilation
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Cinder blocks are made with coal cinders to make them lighter.
Concrete blocks are made with concrete to make them stronger.
Many people mistakenly call concrete blocks, cinder blocks, just as many people mistakenly talk about steam shovels which haven't used steam for over a hundred years.
If you go to a dealer and ask for a cinder block, they may give you one, so don't ask for them. Ask for concrete blocks.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinder_block
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