Garden paths

I have started to plan my garden by laying out paths (raking off grass and moss). I now want to "permanent" the paths by laying down material that is like paver base (very finely ground stone material). I planned to actually use paver base (gray) and add tint to get, for instance, a rust color. However, I think this would be a *lot* of work, so my question is, what other finely ground *colored* stone material are there that could be used?
Thanks -- Hans L
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It all depends upon the stone or other material you choose as your path material. Off hand I can think of several that stray from the 'straight gray' color of #10 crushed stone (the typical material in my region used as a bed for drylaid brick or flagstone). Your best bet would be to visit a stoneyard and see what materials are commonly available in your area.
Dave

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I don't know where you are, but in this part of central Texas people used decomposed granite, with a few inches of crushed granite on top of that.
V

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How funny that you and I are sitting here thinking the same thing! jojo
opined:

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Yes, but we are at a great advantage, it's mined right here in central Texas, so we have excellent access to it, at a very reasonable price. Not everyone has that opportunity. In New Mexico, crushed lava or lava sand is a local resource of material good for paths, but it is a much deeper color of near red/burgundy.
V

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True....where are you Hans??

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On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 19:12:58 GMT, jojo wrote:

Hello jojo:
I live in the Cleveland area in Ohio.
Hans L
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Hans, I have a wonderful suggestion. Crushed granite. It is naturally the "rust" color your looking for. It is very durable stuff. We use it here in Texas for many applications from pervious driveways to garden paths. Almost all of Austin's running trails are made of crushed granite.
look at the 4th pic from the bottom (the one with the little dog) that is crushed granite. http://www.fbg.net/wsadd/Fredburg/217PTL.htm this one also has some pics of crushed granite http://www.stoneyisland.com/decorative.htm
The thing I really like about it is it looks almost like dirt...gives the garden a very natural feel, but it does not get muddy and does not wash out easily. Use the small size to form a compact path that is weed resistant.
http://www.cloburn.co.uk/landscape.htm "It is free draining, impervious to frost action, and due to the inherent strength of the granite, will not deteriorate with constant use."
around here in Texas, it is relatively cheap as well...$40.00 a ton.
Good luck! jojo
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Hans L wrote:

I have paths of decomposed granite (DG). It is tan with a slight pink blush. Under it is some kind of garden cloth to prevent weeds from rooting through into the soil below. Be sure to get DG all from the same source as different sources will be slightly different in color.
After it was wet a few times by my sprinkler system, it packed down quite hard. I can now rake it without severely disturbing the surface. However, when it is truly wet (e.g., within two hours after the sprinklers run), my shoes do leave prints; these are easily removed when I rake.
Note that, in my area, we get only light frosts. The soil NEVER freezes. If you live in an area where freezing is a problem, you will need at least a gravel foundation under the DG. Then you will need extra DG because it will work down into the gravel.
By the way, I had the paths installed 3 feet wide. This reduces the frequency with which I must trim the lawn and ground cover at the edges. It also made it easier for my mother (who uses a walker) to navigate.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David Ross wrote:

You could install landscape fabric between the gravel and the stone dust. This will allow the gravel to provide drainage (so the freezing doesn't heave the subsoil) and prevent the stone dust from making the gravel impermeable.
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On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 21:04:56 -0400, Hans L wrote:

I wish to thank you all responders to my question. Seems as if granite is the answer, and I will contact sellers in this area (Cleveland, Ohio) to see what they have and can deliver.
Regards -- Hans L
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