Garden Emergency

Page 2 of 2  
On Tue, 18 May 2004 12:26:56 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@netscapeSPAM-ME-NOT.net (paghat) posted:

News to me. Which ones?

Which ones?

Like everything pretty much? Common sense goes a long way.

Examples?
That was the Japanese workers who drank roundup and died from the dishliquid that it contains?

Same dishwashing liquid? Many kids are killed from dishwasher detergent. Nasty stuff.

Examples?
My, such informative rational language. Do you get many people taking much notice of this hyperbole?

More intemperate language? First up, it is most likely that the increase in allergic (asthma etc) reactions is due to ultra-cleanliness from overuse of chemicals such as disinfectants. Also paranoia about childhood diseases. I have two middle aged nieces with asthma, and there is none in any other member of the extended family. Hey Ho, their Mum is a neurotic cleanliness nut.

You mean you don't look at the evidence? Intemperate hyperbole won't convince me, sorry.

All say keep out of reach of children, so that should be a given. Integrated Pest Management allows the use of these things. Hell, Organics allows the use of that nasty copper fungicide.

What exactly was in this spray? Do we know? Maybe it was a totally harmless substance?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 May 2004 17:50:01 GMT, "Cereus-validus"

Tell that to those who got sprayed with agent orange

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Agent Orange was the code name for an herbicide that was not approved for home use and certainly was not the ivy killer the child was spryaing.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not sure about "home use", but Agent Orange (or at least the 2 compoments) WERE approved for commercial sale. "Orange" was just a 50-50 mix of 2-4-D and 2-4-5-T. Both were sold and used in every corner of farm country.
Both are actually OK. It's the dioxen impurities that caused problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

An 11 year old is a CHILD. And no responsible parent or gardener would leave weed killers and other poisons in reach of kids. I mean c'mon, the kid didn't even know what the hell they were spraying! The kid thought it was insecticide, which is just as bad and something kids should not have access to. I stand by what I said..the fact that the original poster lets his kids have access to chemicals and poisons, and was freaking out about some stupid plants instead of the fact his kid could have poisoned herself, shows he is ignorant, irresponsible, and has seriously messed up priorities. So what if a plant dies? You can replace it. But if your child dies......
SueNY
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Okay then, put the kids in hermetically sealed plastic bubbles and hide them away from the cruel world full of evil nasty things. Is that wat you want?
Are you ever aware of when you cross the line from being protective to being an overly obsessive nut?
If you had any sense at all, you would have checked the warning labels before letting kids have easy access to the chemicals.
And if you knew anything at all about plants, you would have known that plant auxins (weed killers) are not toxic in any way to animals or children.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That works for me. People in my neighborhood let the kids run wild as soon as they can open the front door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michelle wrote:

Maybe yours can but this kid obviously can't.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm no 'child wellfare whitch hunter' (sic) but I'm surely not going to let *any* child spray weed killers of any sort, nor any other household chemicals, at all.
--
Ann, Gardening in zone 6a
Just south of Boston, MA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SueNYC wrote:

Oh for cripes' sakes, get over yourself. You have absolutely NO idea what the circumstances of this situation are beyond the fact that an 11 year old accidentally sprayed plants with ivy killer. Our kids have been working in our gardens, WITH SUPERVISION, for years. They have, on occasion, been allowed to spray weeds with herbicide. They are extremely responsible and have respect for what they are doing and I trust them.
I also let my kids work with the horses on their own. I suppose in your world I am irresponsible and a terrible parent to do so. But I prefer to teach them well and trust their instincts - so far I've managed to raise three children past the 11 year old mark without killing any of them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is a fascinating exchange.
I think it is possible that some people simply DON'T KNOW (no excuse for them) that children are extremely sensitive to chemicals, and it can damage them for life and/or kill them.
For example: how often do you hear about lead poisoning in adults? But we probably are all, of all ages, sensitive to lead. Children, however, can be permanently damaged by it.
So, the OP (and others) is so stupid they don't realize this. Let those of us who are good with facts offer them citations where they can educate themselves about these dangers. I can't help on that score--I never remember where I learned things!
I suspect a troll here. But it is interesting to note that others think it OK for kids to handle chemicals. Woe unto them.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So you are getting off on this thread, Betsy Wetsy?
Good for you. Glad we could entertain you, biatch.
Considering recent encounters with misbehaving children and their parents who make no effort to control them, one would think that a few wouldn't be missed by them or others who are forced to tolerate the obnoxious little brats.
Sorry to hear about your permanent brain damage from lead poisoning. Maybe now you will learn paint chips are not candy. Maybe not.
You obviously can't grasp the fact that everything we take into our bodies is chemicals.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course everything we take into our bodies are chemicals. The point is that some chemicals are more dangerous to our bodies than others. Gee, Cereus, you know this or you wouldn't be alive to rant. Or maybe you just want everybody to be as crippled and deformed as you? ;-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 19 May 2004 10:27:12 -0600, "tmtresh"

so why do some folks (especially those who rave and rant and exaggerate) say ALL "chemicals" are "deadly"? That what this bloke was saying I thought.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 May 2004 17:24:55 -0400, Callen Molenda

Exactly my point. most children aren't stupid and if they are taught properly most times they will make correct decisions. and we should not criticize any one for how they rais their children unless they are beating them or neglecting the care of a child too young to care for them selvs like those idiots who leave kids home alone and then they burn the house down. and that sort of thing. For all we know the parent was standing right next to the kid when they were spraying and just noticed after the fact that it was the wrong chemical . And I don't think I'm a bad parent for leting my children use house hold clleaners . I don't let them use coxic one s of course but my son likes to help me clean the kitchen or windows and he will run the vacume ( he likes to help and askes if he can ) I'm not letting him clean the toilet or tile in the bathroom or anything like that but he is very helpful. children need to learn to do things My kids help me cook and I let them be near the stove under controled conditions . I know lots of folks that couldn't make a hot dog if they didnt' have a microwave Not my kids My son can almost bake a batch of chocolate chip cookies by him self ALMOST Oh how we forget that children used to apprentice in trades when they were at the some times young age of seven. Not that I think that seven year olds should be put to work but the average age for a forge smith apprentice was exactly eleven years old now days it is more like end of high school and up. Kids need good examples and they learn from those examples. Any way this is not a garden topic anyone want to talk about gardening and not about bad parenting I'm sure there is a news group for that since there is a news group for everything else including .... well not going there said enough
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

None of the rest of us have ever set something down and had it picked up by our kids. (FYI, there are instructions on the container on what to do if the chemicals come in contact with your skin.) Your response is way out of line.
Yes, we all saw the sitcom where the baby died after secondary contact with a garden spray but this is not a sitcom and we know nothing about what happened except that a kid sprayed a plant with ivy killer.
Sue, do you have any children? If so, what are their ages?
--
Mac Cool

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll have to join the w(h)itch hunter posse ...
What is 11 yo, around 5th grade? Hopefully she can read, although she may have just have been overzealous for wanting to help, lied about mistaking for bug spray, the pretty picture of ivy on the bottle and assumed it was for spraying on plants (which it is).
This is why all herbicides should have kid friendly warnings like "Elmo says bad water make plants go poo-poo!" But that might just encourage them. How about a cartoon plant with a death skull lying prone in a cesspool of blood? Or you could just keep the stuff away until your kid understands how to use the product properly?
Prepare your kids for a lifetime of not reading the useless instructions on product labels which may have included such verbiage as "It is a violation of Federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling."
-- Felonious Jail-Bird "it's not a crime unless you get caught and/or are underage" Thumb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe she did it on purpose as a protest against bad parents. Perhaps, in a desperate appeal to the neighbourhood, the plucky little heroine bravely spelled out "PLEASE SAVE MY SIBLINGS" in weedkiller.
Janet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What kind of plants? Garden transplants/seedlings? Ornamental or vegetables? Or established plants of size?

How long ago were they sprayed? Have you taken any action since they were sprayed.
I'm not familiar with the "active ingredients" in ivy killer. What is it, 24D, or what? Are the plants showing signs of damage, or are they dead by now?
Many plants in my yard were accidentally s prayed with Round Up, some died, some yellowed, but are still alive. Some were damaged last year, but survived.
I once had a house plant that grew all twisted, and gnarled, I personally felt it had a disease, but another thought it was showing signs of 24D contamination. It never recovered.
The package should have given some sort of indication of what steps to take if accidentally sprayed on desirable plants, usually hosing them off immediately, but if 24 hours has passed, which I'm sure it has, then about all I am aware you can do is wait and see what happens. If you can, contact the county agricultural agent if you are in the USA and explain what has happened (if there are any plants alive at this point) and see if they have any recommendations.
Personally if these plants are cheap and not very old, I'd wait and see, hoping that you hosed them off as soon as you learned they'd been sprayed... and see what they do. Sure, go ahead talk to the county agent/mastergardeners... and get info from more than one source there, a trusted long established garden center with a trained person not some seasonal employee,..and compare notes.
If the plants go yellow all over, and they're cheap, dig them out and toss them. If they're older plants, might want to talk to the experts and wait. I have had poppies come back from being hit a bit with roundup, woody plants may lose this year's foliage and vigor, yet come back next year.. or grow new leaves this year. As long as an expensive plant still showed signs of life, I'd give it the benefit of doubt and time and see if it manages to pull through. Particularly if any of your experts can give you steps to try!
Good luck. And perhaps take the occasion to explain to your daughter she should always ask before using, and always always.. read the labels no matter what she uses inside or out .. before using the product for the first time. We all should do that, be fewer oopses in life ;-)
Janice

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.