Garden design software?

We are sorting out our garden. Does anybody know of any software whereby I could use a picture of our empty flowerbed and be able to place pictures of flowers from a database? We could then place and arrange exactly how it should look and then get and put in the palnts for real. If there isn't such a thing there should be!
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Any graphics program will do this. You could set up a grid in Excel and paste pictures in it.
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Yes, but I don't have any pics. What is needed is a group of different flowers of various heights and colours and one can just place them in the pic of the empty garden and arrange until happy..... Well that's what I would like...
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There are lots. Perhaps this will help: http://landscaping-software-review.toptenreviews.com/
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On Mon, 13 Apr 2009 07:54:18 -0700 (PDT), Pete L

Many of these applications are just too complex or too limited. The ones I have tried are more fun than useful. However, keeping a garden journel can be a valued tool, no software required.
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I

Three useful things concerning landscaping. First the scrubs and trees can grow large so distance from you house etc matters. Foundation planting can hide termites and other critters. Then depending on who built your house contractors have been know to bury wood and lime when they back fill. The latter being and issue of termites and possible trouble for acid loving plants.
I prefer books and magazines.
<http://www.the-landscape-design-site.com/
Be sure to read the 4 th link down.
Bill
--
Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
Not all who wander are lost.
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This is really a superior way to work up a plan. First, in a mature established landscape there is a much better sense of how BIG things are going to be. For example: in the city nobody thinks about how damn big that little pine tree is going to be in 10, 20, 30 years or how it will eat the house. Two doors down they got one of those big suckers and I have calculated that when it goes down it wont hit our house! and yet, across the street somebody has planted a little blue pine ignoring how ugly the big thing is across the street (loses the lower branches and looks nekked). sigh.
People with really great looking landscapes usually have an idea of flowering times as well as the scale of the plants at maturity. So they are good people to go to the door and talk to them about their landscape. If they did it themselves they are going to be delighted to talk about it (fantastic landscaping in the front of the house is a sign of outgoing people!), and, AND, they will often be ready and willing to give you pieces of perennials when they divide. So they can be a source of free plants.
The other thing that I do is take a picture of the area, bring it up into Microsoft publisher and paste hardscape and little cropped pictures of plants on the top to get a feel for what it will look like done. But it does take knowing the plant, how high, how wide.
I have a small city garden and made mistakes with things like dwarf spirea that altho I absolutely LOVE LOVE LOVE them they simply were too big and were dwarfing and killing my low growing evergreens that provide some color when the ground is bare.
well... my gardens change a lot over time. I have updated quite a bit of my backyard recently http://weloveteaching.com/landscape/MOHlandscape.html
Ingrid

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