Fruit tree madness

Have posted in the past about two :"classic" variety fruit trees r+- 3-4 years old, planted same time. Blenheim Apricot doing well, Santa Rosa plum not. Lots of suckers which I remove -- Apricot has none --little and tired foliage.
NOTE that in the past I had same two trees, same two varieties; yielded for years like gang busters till they had to be "retired".
Even factoring in global warming; even gnashing teeth over TWO recent heat waves never before experienced at this season in my [censored] years in So.Calif coastal...
...with all this, I'm still thunderstruck to behold the "ailing" plum BLOSSOMING, when it's supposed to be shedding leaves (like its companion apricot), in prep. for "winter"!
Now I don't know whether to fertilize it or not!
Will post pic later today.
HB
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On 10/9/2014 1:14 PM, Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

Do not fertilize the trees now. All stone fruits require a winter rest. Feeding now will encourage new growth and interfere with that rest period. It's bad enough that the 2013-2014 winter was exceptionally warm, which prevented sufficient rest even for stone fruits specially hybridized for mild-winter climates. If this winter is equally warm, a number of deciduous trees across southern California might start dying.
The plum might be blossoming in response to stress. Many woody plants and herbacious perennials will bloom out of season to propagate their species when stressed. In your case, the plum might even die without setting fruit.
I am very concerned about my 'Santa Barbara' peach tree. It requires about 300 hours of winter chill (hours of temperatures at or below 45F from the beginning of November to the end of March). Living somewhat inland with the Santa Monica Mountains between me and Malibu, the average winter chill in my garden was been over 350 hours over the 12 years from the winter of 2001-2002 through the winter of 2012-2013. The winter of 2013-2014, however, provided less than 130 hours. I got only three peaches this year, and the tree was quite late in leafing out.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 10/10/2014 11:45 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

Many years ago, I heard of someone who was trying to grow somethign in an area where it supposedly wouldn't grow because it didn't get enough winter chilling. The solution for that gardener was to fill large plastic ice cream tubs with water once frozen to turn the ice outonto the roots.
I can't for the life of me now remember who the story involved, where they lived or what they were trying to grow but the memory of the routine has stuck with me. Sounds labour intensive to me and I have no idea if it would work of not. I'd have thought the chill would have been needed around the foliage area, but who knows. Anyone?
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On 10/9/2014 10:06 PM, Fran Farmer wrote:

I wanted to grow peonies after seeing them at Longwood Garden (Pennsylvania) and Winterthur (Delaware). A local nursery told me that the necessary chill has to be applied to the branches and growth buds. He suggested a wire mesh cylinder about 2 feet wider and taller than the shrub. I should place the cylinder over the shrub at the end of October and keep it filled with ice cubes until I remove it in March. n Apparently, winter chill has to be felt by the entire plant, not merely the roots.
So I have citrus, rosemary, eugenia, camellias, bearded iris, and other plants that tolerate my mild-winter climate. No, I cannot grow Dutch tulips; but lady tulips (Tulipa clausiana) have naturalized in my garden. I also have various narcissus, freesias, lilies of the Nile, and grape hyacinths (Muscari).
I have not seen snow in my area in over 15 years. In the 41 years I have lived in my current house, I saw snow here only three times. When we did get it, it all melted after only an hour or two. I do get more winter chill than Hypatia Nachshon or Higgs Boson although they are within 40 miles of where I live, but killing frosts are extremely rare even in my area.
Born, raised, and married in the city of Los Angeles and now living a 5-minute walk outside of Los Angeles County, I did not see snow fall out of the sky until I was 34 years old, on a business trip to Philadelphia.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Friday, October 10, 2014 8:00:47 AM UTC-7, David E. Ross wrote:

David, that sounds like a whole ****load of ice cubes! Did't it make you a big electricity bill? Straight question.
I had the "advantage" of growing up in NE Pennsylvania where we most certainly had snow! As kids, we bellyflopped on our sleds on the street right in front of the house.
Then at university in Chicago, let me tell you about winter!!! I worked part time at the Faculty Club. I'd wash my hair in the morning, walk to work, and arrive with a head full of icicles. Thought nothing of it at the time...
Ah, Memory Lane!
HB
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On 10/10/2014 6:42 PM, Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

Oh, I never tried planting peonies after being advised about the amount of chill required.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 11/10/2014 2:00 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

They gave you the wrong advice if you only wanted to grow a paeony. That advice would only apply to a tree paeony. Paeonys die back to nothing in winter and only put out new growth during the Spring.
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On 10/12/2014 12:45 AM, Fran Farmer wrote:

I wanted woody bush peonies, not herbaceous perennials.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 13/10/2014 2:47 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

Ah! I've never seen anyone who just uses 'paeony' if they meant anything other than an herbaceous paeony.
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On Thursday, October 9, 2014 10:06:03 PM UTC-7, Fran Farmer wrote:

I've heard that one too. Now you've got me wondering whether it IS for the roots or the foliage. Sigh! One more thing to look up...
Speaking of winter chill, after many decades of yearning to plant blueberri es, I learned some years ago that theew have beee developed several varieti es that can manage with the winter "chill" available here. I rushed to bu y several varieties, but after a season or two, they resigned. Could be my mismanagement (never!!); could be many factors. I just don't have the tim e to try again, so will have to buy them in season at farmers mkts or co-op .
All those efforts of growers to develop blueberries requiring less winter chill may be moot now, with the effects of global warming crashing down on us.
HB
HB
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On Thursday, October 9, 2014 5:45:40 PM UTC-7, David E. Ross wrote:

Right; I was thinking along the same lines about "stress". Like all living things, the tree's first imperative is to procreate. Analogy: Soldiers going off to war, not sure if they will return, impregnating their partner to ensure passing on their genes.

It's AWFUL how rapidly GC is altering our gardening AND our lives. I am truly sorry about the peach tree & can only hope it will pull through.
One can measure change by small things over last few years. Creeps up on o ne almost imperceptibly. Never did bring out certain "winter" clothes. Ne ver did use bath pillow for rare hot baths in the depths of "winter". Etc.
Did you read that leader of [very small country] ? which is about to be eng ulfed by rising ocean, has already bought space in [higher country] to move population. Anybody remember which?

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On 12/10/2014 5:42 AM, Hypatia Nachshon wrote:

I've not heard of that but Kiribati (pronounced Kiribus) would be a very likely candidate. If it's not Kiribati, then it could be the Maldives which is very low or any number number of Pacific nations.
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On Sunday, October 12, 2014 12:49:22 AM UTC-7, Fran Farmer wrote:

Bingo! Kiribati it is!
http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-11-21/kiribati-climate-change-destroys-pacific-island-nation .
HB
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Fran Farmer wrote:

If you need your roots iced I can hook you up with my ex wife. heheh
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Its really great to read this info.. Thanks guys for your concern.
--
J9anglica


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On Thu, 9 Oct 2014 13:14:19 -0700 (PDT), Hypatia Nachshon

plum not. Lots of suckers which I remove -- Apricot has none --little and tired foliage.

in So.Calif coastal...

apricot), in prep. for "winter"!

All of the pitt fruit trees that i know of require some number of hours under 40 degrees F (5 degrees C) to set fruit properly. different varieties have different requirements, some as little as 200 hours to as much as 750 hours that i have seen. I suspect this may be (at least part of) what is bothering your trees.
?-)
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On 10/29/2014 6:19 AM, josephkk wrote:

I have seen 45F cited as the threshold for chill. That is the threshold given in Sunset's "Western Garden Book" and in Wikipedia's "Chilling requirement".
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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josephkk wrote:

"pitt fruit"? You must mean *stone fruit*.
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wrote:

Rosa plum not. Lots of suckers which I remove -- Apricot has none --little and tired foliage.

in So.Calif coastal...

apricot), in prep. for "winter"!

Yep. the correct term would not come to mind.
?-)
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